Mental Health – Open Mind http://open-mind.org/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 06:34:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://open-mind.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6-150x150.png Mental Health – Open Mind http://open-mind.org/ 32 32 Farmers’ Dinner Theater Raises Mental Health Awareness | news https://open-mind.org/farmers-dinner-theater-raises-mental-health-awareness-news/ https://open-mind.org/farmers-dinner-theater-raises-mental-health-awareness-news/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 05:15:00 +0000 https://open-mind.org/farmers-dinner-theater-raises-mental-health-awareness-news/ The Logan and Warren County’s Cooperative Expansion Offices hosted the Farmers’ Dinner Theater last week to promote mental health awareness in rural southern Kentucky. Students from schools in Logan and Warren Counties participated in the program by spending the week learning about farm safety and how to promote the mental wellbeing of residents. The University […]]]>


The Logan and Warren County’s Cooperative Expansion Offices hosted the Farmers’ Dinner Theater last week to promote mental health awareness in rural southern Kentucky.

Students from schools in Logan and Warren Counties participated in the program by spending the week learning about farm safety and how to promote the mental wellbeing of residents. The University of Kentucky College of Nursing helped make teaching easier.

On Thursday evening, at the Russellville expansion office, more than 150 people watched as students perform a series of skits that demonstrated what they had learned. The students acted out situations that are often seen on farms that could harm someone’s mental health.

Each person in attendance was also treated to a free steak dinner while the students performed their skits.

Janet Turley, Warren County 4-H’s youth development officer, said the event was focused on mental health as the farming community has high suicide rates following the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Believe it or not, Warren and Logan Counties, along with Henderson and Daviess Counties, have had multiple suicides. We’re the two highlighted groups for that, ”Turley said. “Also, I think they chose us because we are counties that have active programs and active agents that can make it happen.”

Turley said the program was funded by a grant the UK College of Nursing worked with the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

Funding for the scholarship was made possible through support from Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, the AARP, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Kentucky Beef Council.

Turley said the dinner theater was created to encourage meaningful conversations within families about mental health once they got home from the event.

“They (farmers) may experience some of these situations and be encouraged to seek that additional help,” said Turley. “The skits practice breathing exercises for coping with and dealing with someone contemplating suicide.”

A UK press release said the Farmers’ Dinner Theater model was developed by Deborah Reed, a professor emeritus at the UK College of Nursing.

The press release also states that 112 of Kentucky’s 120 counties are currently considered “medically underserved.”

Turley saw the high turnout for the community on Thursday as a positive sign of the future health of the area.

“My minimum goal was that I would have liked to have 100 people here, and I think we exceeded that number by a long way,” she said. “It’s just great that people are raising mental health awareness and seeing these kids perform. I am very proud of these children. “

Students participating in the week-long program were in at least eighth grade and consisted mostly of 4-H and FFA members.

Caver Woosley, 15, a new freshman at South Warren High School, said he was interested in the event after previously witnessing several middle school classmates struggling with mental health.

“I had no idea how to properly deal with these issues beforehand,” said Woosley. “I’ve learned a lot this week.”

One particular skill that Woosley and Jenna Coles, a 16-year-old prospective junior junior at Logan County High School, learned was QPR (asking, persuading, and referring) training.

Turley said QPR is similar to CPR in that training is an orderly set of guidelines for equipping a person to help someone who is having a health crisis.

“I wanted to learn more about mental health because I know a lot of people around me are struggling with it,” Coles said of her involvement. “Sometimes I don’t know how to handle it or really comfort her. This has given me the knowledge and resources I need to help the people in my community. “

– Follow reporter John Reecer on Twitter @JReecerBGDN or visit bgdailynews.com.



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Minnesota COVID Nurse Prays Psychological Scars Will Heal https://open-mind.org/minnesota-covid-nurse-prays-psychological-scars-will-heal/ https://open-mind.org/minnesota-covid-nurse-prays-psychological-scars-will-heal/#respond Sun, 18 Jul 2021 20:35:00 +0000 https://open-mind.org/minnesota-covid-nurse-prays-psychological-scars-will-heal/ “COVID has completely changed my life,” said Allen, a Cottage Grove nurse who worked with coronavirus patients for a year. “My God, did it leave a few scars on me. I pray that one day they will heal. “ For many frontline health professionals and nurses, the coronavirus pandemic is far from over – and […]]]>


“COVID has completely changed my life,” said Allen, a Cottage Grove nurse who worked with coronavirus patients for a year. “My God, did it leave a few scars on me. I pray that one day they will heal. “

For many frontline health professionals and nurses, the coronavirus pandemic is far from over – and it’s taking a terrible toll.

Recent studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Kaiser Family Foundation, and other groups have found that during the pandemic, more than half of health workers suffered from negative mental symptoms – from stress and fatigue to depression, anxiety, and even Thoughts of suicide.

These symptoms can often be made worse by concerns about their physical health and that of their families from exposure to COVID-19.

It’s a national, even global, struggle, and health officials, advocates, and workers say it makes an impact here in Minnesota.

Allen was a nurse in two COVID-19 intensive care units in St. Paul, first at St. Joseph’s and then at Bethesda Hospital. “Unfortunately I saw the sickest of the sick,” she said.

Patients, young and old, we are constantly fighting for their lives. Some lost the battle.

“The mental toll it has taken on me and some of my co-workers has been something … I never thought I would be here and feel the way I feel,” she said. “It gets to the point where you feel helpless.”

Eventually, Allen sought counseling and was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. She shares her experiences to encourage others with similar problems to seek help.

“I don’t want people to feel sorry for me,” she said. “I needed help and I got it.”

But Allen says it shouldn’t have been so difficult for her to get help. She believes the health system does not have enough support to help workers who face trauma on a daily basis.

During the pandemic, patients always came first, but self-care was often neglected.

“If anything, we have to learn from our mistakes here,” said Allen. “It’s hard because you’re so busy with so many things, yourself is an afterthought.”

Access isn’t the only problem. Nicole Mattson, vice president of Care Providers of Minnesota, who works to help long-term care workers access mental health services, says convincing health workers they need help can be difficult.

“We have found that health workers are not good at asking for help or accepting resources,” Mattson said. “You are naturally used to putting others first.”

What workers say

There have been a number of surveys conducted by national authorities on groups of health workers and the impact of the pandemic on their mental health. Findings were broadly similar for workers suffering from stress, fatigue, burnout, depression, substance abuse, and thoughts of suicide.

Here are more details:

  • The CDC found that more than half of the public health workers surveyed had symptoms of mental health impairment. Symptoms included depression, anxiety, and PTSD with a small number of thoughts about suicide.
  • A survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Washington Post found that 62 percent of health care workers surveyed said the stress of dealing with the pandemic is having a negative impact on their mental health.
  • Mental Health America found that 75 percent of health workers surveyed experienced physical and emotional exhaustion and burnout in the workplace. The same percentage worried about infecting their children and family members.
  • Another CDC poll found that 70 percent of parents and unpaid adult caregivers had mental health problems.

What are the causes?

Sue Abderholden, executive director of the National Alliance on Mental Illness-Minnesota, said the pandemic was a stressful event for almost everyone. Worry, insecurity, and upside-down routines have been tough for people across the board.

“We all just went through a pretty traumatic experience,” said Abderholden. “We’re all in the same ocean, just in different boats.”

However, health workers have faced unprecedented illnesses and deaths in addition to typical pandemic battles.

“For them to keep going there and seeing these deaths and doing all they can without really knowing how best to help people. It’s just very tough, ”said Abderholden.

She noted that the pandemic had a more serious impact on communities of color, including those who work in healthcare – including their mental health. This is another reason the state needs to do more to diversify the ranks of its mental health care workers.

Dr. Ruth Lynfield, state epidemiologist for the Minnesota Department of Health, said misinformation, threats and bullying have also placed a burden on health workers. The CDC survey of public health workers found that a quarter of respondents felt threatened in some way because of their work.

“We’re used to being under the radar,” Lynfield said of public health workers. But suddenly they were under intense public scrutiny, who often did not like the strategies they recommended to contain the outbreak.

“It’s hard when you’re tired and burned out. They don’t have the same strength, ”said Lynfield. “We know ways to reduce the transmission of this virus. It’s hard when there are people who just don’t care. “

What can be done to help

Kathryn Como-Sabetti, the head of COVID-19 epidemiology at the state health ministry, said the pandemic had made it clear that many public health establishments lack sufficient resources to respond to a widespread pandemic.

The state has reassigned hundreds of workers to help respond to the pandemic. Smaller district authorities did not have this luxury.

“The extent of it was so much bigger than we ever imagined,” said Como-Sabetti. This can make it difficult when an employee has to take time off to deal with personal issues.

“I think what has been hard for people to say they have to resign is that they are worried that they are causing more stress to their co-workers,” she said.

Similar challenges exist in long-term care, an industry that struggled with low wages and labor shortages before the pandemic. Mattson of Care Providers of Minnesota said the time has come to reassess the importance of care providers.

“Nursing work enables other work,” she said. “There needs to be a reassessment of what it means to take care of our caregivers.”

The Minnesota Legislature recently approved new funds to strengthen the ranks of long-term care workers. There is also a working group that will decide how to distribute $ 250 million in “hero wages” to the frontline workers.

Health workers have called both efforts a “good first step” but indicate that much more needs to be done.

Employers are also working to make mental health care and other resources more readily available. Some are setting up “personal port” rooms with on-demand advisory services. Others use smartphone apps to regularly check employees to see if they need help.

However, Abderholden says employers also need to do a better job of equipping employees with the resources available. Many workers may still feel they are being discriminated against when speaking openly about their need for psychiatric treatment.

In addition, Abderholden hopes the pandemic and the challenges it poses will lead to a better understanding of mental health care and those who may be struggling.

“Really, I think there are very few people who haven’t been depressed or apprehensive about the situation for a day or two or more,” she said. “I hope there will be a lot more empathy in the future.”



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San Jose Launches Mental Health Platform to Help Teenagers https://open-mind.org/san-jose-launches-mental-health-platform-to-help-teenagers/ https://open-mind.org/san-jose-launches-mental-health-platform-to-help-teenagers/#respond Sun, 18 Jul 2021 01:11:45 +0000 https://open-mind.org/san-jose-launches-mental-health-platform-to-help-teenagers/ SAN JOSE, Calif. (BCN) – The city of San Jose on Friday launched a new mental health platform to help teens and young adults find services. OneSJ, a website offered in English, Spanish, and Vietnamese, lists mental health services in both the city and the entire Bay Area. It allows users to filter services based […]]]>


SAN JOSE, Calif. (BCN) – The city of San Jose on Friday launched a new mental health platform to help teens and young adults find services.

OneSJ, a website offered in English, Spanish, and Vietnamese, lists mental health services in both the city and the entire Bay Area. It allows users to filter services based on categories such as domestic violence, unaccomodated, LGBTQIA, and college students.

“This is an approach for us to build better digital services in the public sector,” said Clay Garner, the city’s deputy chief innovation officer.

OneSJ is the first product launched by the Digital Action Corps – a Mayor’s Technology and Innovation initiative that works with tech-savvy high school students to develop digital solutions to pressing urban challenges.

There are currently four San Jose State University students / alumni in the Digital Action Corps, which provides mentoring for tech-savvy students to help them achieve their career goals.

“You ultimately identified the problem (adolescent / young adult mental crisis), designed the solution and created the website,” said city spokeswoman Gina Rodriguez. “The SJSU team volunteered their talent and time to support San Jose in a time of need.”

The students are SJSU graduate Justin Mata, graduate Angela Pham, graduate Flor Sario and student Kunwarpreet Singh.

Copyright © 2021 Bay City News, Inc.



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Missouri AFL-CIO Launches Human Resources Development and Mental Health Initiative https://open-mind.org/missouri-afl-cio-launches-human-resources-development-and-mental-health-initiative/ https://open-mind.org/missouri-afl-cio-launches-human-resources-development-and-mental-health-initiative/#respond Fri, 16 Jul 2021 20:43:26 +0000 https://open-mind.org/missouri-afl-cio-launches-human-resources-development-and-mental-health-initiative/ JEFFERSON CITY, Mon .– Missouri AFL-CIO launches a new initiative to improve diversity, Mental healthand economic opportunities for the Missouri workforce. The Missouri Works Initiative is a four-pronged approach that aims to connect Missourians to new opportunities through education, networking, and health information. Greta Bax, executive director of the initiative, said she looks forward to […]]]>


JEFFERSON CITY, Mon .– Missouri AFL-CIO launches a new initiative to improve diversity, Mental healthand economic opportunities for the Missouri workforce.

The Missouri Works Initiative is a four-pronged approach that aims to connect Missourians to new opportunities through education, networking, and health information.

Greta Bax, executive director of the initiative, said she looks forward to working with AFL-CIO President Jake Hummel and Treasury Secretary Merri Berry to meet the full spectrum of workers’ needs.

“Most of the time when people hear about the AFL-CIO, they know about the political and lobbying arm of organized labor. When we started an affiliate organization, Jake and Merri’s goal was to support every part of a worker’s life, ”Bax told the Missouri Times. “We as an organization make sure we have a positive impact on all working Missourians, and to do that you need to be willing to rise to the challenge and take on some of these employee initiatives.”

The Dislocated Worker Program helps dismissed union workers apply for unemployment benefits and get free training opportunities. The team is currently offering a workshop on changing jobs and peer counseling alongside the Institute for Higher Education and Personnel Development (DHEWD). AFL-CIO has hosted the program for more than 20 years and is now being treated under the new initiative.

The initiative also offers a Worker Wellness Program (WPP), which focuses on providing information about mental health problems and health problems in the workplace. WPP plans to work with local agencies to tailor its programs to specific communities. Dr. John Gaal, a certified wellness practitioner who previously served as a trainer for the St. Louis-Kansas City Carpenters Regional Council, leads the program.

Building Union Diversity (BUD) St. Louis strives to expand access to the construction industry and create a more diverse workforce. Active since 2014, Bax said the five-week education program has helped more than 250 St. Louis residents, touted a 90 percent graduation rate, and sent 81 percent of graduates straight into construction jobs after completing the program. It also hosts a closing event where workers can network and apply for positions with potential employers.

The Missouri Apprentice Ready Program, the newest branch of the initiative, is expected to offer its first courses later this year. Another five week course offered in Kansas City and Springfield in association with DHEWD, efforts are coordinated with Gov. Mike Parsons The aim is to increase the state workforce and have 20,000 participants in training programs by 2025. The program is supported by a government investment of US $ 1 million.

“The Missouri Works Initiative is uniquely positioned to take on the role of expanding apprenticeship programs nationwide through its partnerships and connections across Missouri with organized workers, registered training coordinators, contractors and employers,” said Hummel. “I am looking forward to expanding the successful years of the AFL-CIO for employees.”

With some programs already delivering results and new efforts on the horizon, Bax looks forward to expanding the initiative with new programs and providing additional support to the Missouri workforce in the future.

“It is a unique opportunity to have a more focused impact on people development,” said Bax. “We have a lot of know-how and a lot of good people take on these challenges. We will see how things develop and change over time, but we will focus on providing economic opportunity for all Missourians. “



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Doctors, mental illness and the problem with “passing” https://open-mind.org/doctors-mental-illness-and-the-problem-with-passing/ https://open-mind.org/doctors-mental-illness-and-the-problem-with-passing/#respond Fri, 16 Jul 2021 08:43:46 +0000 https://open-mind.org/doctors-mental-illness-and-the-problem-with-passing/ M.The patient sits with her back bent, her gaze fixed on the taupe-colored industrial carpet as if fervently avoiding Medusa’s gaze. She tells me about the depression that has haunted her life, undermined her career, and infiltrated her relationships. She tells me about the drugs that she tried that “failed” as if patients were failing […]]]>


M.The patient sits with her back bent, her gaze fixed on the taupe-colored industrial carpet as if fervently avoiding Medusa’s gaze. She tells me about the depression that has haunted her life, undermined her career, and infiltrated her relationships. She tells me about the drugs that she tried that “failed” as if patients were failing and not the other way around. She tells me about lovers and friends who burned out and fell by the wayside. In short, she tells me about the loss, shame and despair that accompanies life on the edge in an experience-rich war zone.

And while she is speaking, she does not know that all of this is terribly, incredibly familiar to me.

I’ve spent the past two decades leading a double life. Outwardly, I’m a psychiatrist – I’ve worked in hospitals, clinics, and private practices. Internally, I often struggle with hopelessness and depression. During my assistantship I spent many days wondering who was more depressed, my patient or me. On ward rounds and at staff meetings, I spoke professionally about patients with mental illness, as if the experiences of despair, isolation, shame, and regret were not reverberating within me.

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Most of my 20 year struggle with depression, littered with lost jobs and relationships and riddled with unsavory experiences such as hospitalization and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), is in the past. I no longer go to the supermarket to buy a banana and a can of yogurt because the future seems uncertain. Yet every time I talk to a patient about ECT or ketamine or one of the numerous drugs I have personally tried, every time I sit with someone who is deeply depressed, my lived experience feels very close.

Erving Goffman, a sociologist who studied hierarchical and relational patterns between groups of people, would have called my experience “temporary”. in the “Stigma,” In his seminal 1963 book, Goffman identified the ways in which people with “undesirable traits” experience interactions with those who lack these traits. Goffman’s subjects varied widely, from those with physical differences, character defects (people who were incarcerated, people with mental illness, and the like) and those of a race or religion other than the cultural norm. Goffman’s genius was that his work was utterly indifferent: it involved indicting the effects of discrimination without ever using the language of social justice. As Goffman wrote, “By definition, of course, we believe that the person with a stigma is not entirely human.”

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Goffman made an important distinction between those whose difference was visible or discernible and those to whom it was hidden; the “discredited” vs. the “discredited”. To some extent the problems of these groups diverge. The person with an invisible stigmatizing attribute is constantly afraid of being exposed. The individual, like me, acquires a double life: there are those who know about the person’s undesirable state and those who do not.

It becomes essential for the individual concerned to keep these groups separate and to protect their secret in society in general. Goffman defined such a precarious, tense existence as “temporary”. As he noted, the effort to persist creates an effort.

Psychiatrists often tell people that there is no shame in being mentally ill. The illness is an illness or the product of traumatic experiences or both, depending on the camp – in any case, the patient is not to blame. Yet clinicians eagerly guard their own history of mental illness. A doctor patient of mine goes to another city to fill out prescriptions so that the pharmacist does not recognize him as a doctor. Another asked me to provide her with drug samples so that her insurance company would not be informed of her psychiatric medication.

My patients go by like me.

When doctors shy away from diagnosing mental illness, how can we expect patients to hold their heads?

During the pandemic, I decided to join a peer supervision group with other psychiatrists in my area. The group meets monthly to discuss both clinical and administrative issues in private practice. Zooming a person, I call her Dr. A., worked in a private mental hospital that I was admitted to 15 years ago. Years ago I had trained with him as a specialist; In fact, I had been looking after him as an inpatient since I was a year ahead.

When doctors shy away from diagnosing mental illness, how can we expect patients to hold their heads?

When looking for a new therapist, a few years ago I had a second doctor, Dr. B., consulted. Although we decided not to work together, he knew quite a bit about my psychiatric history.

When I saw Drs. A. and B. on the screen, I felt my heart racing and sweat collecting on my neck. I was confident about how I spoke and how I looked. The two stared at me over the security of the internet with huge smiles on their faces. My daughter who knows about Paul Ekman work on micro-expressions from the family-friendly television series “Memory games,” would have called this fake smile.

During the meeting, we talked about our practices, who specializes in what, who accepts patients and who doesn’t. In other words, clinical discussion. Neither Dr. A. nor Dr. B. asked me how I was doing or admitted in some way that they knew “my secret”.

Of course, it would have been inappropriate for either of them to say, “So, Susan, what’s the depression like?” Or “Have you been in the hospital lately?” But I also felt forbidden to acknowledge my previous encounters with them.

After the meeting ended, I felt first relief, then shame, and then anger. I was ashamed to be reminded of my history and I was angry that I had to be ashamed that, as a psychiatrist who was also a patient, I was not allowed to be fully seen. I felt that if I had acknowledged my history, that fake smile would have grown even wider and more fake. Because doctors are not allowed to exceed this limit: We shouldn’t become patients.

My first medical school class, like so many other students, was human anatomy. When the course was over I’ve published an essay on the implications of anatomy as a first introduction to medical education. In it, I argued that by dissecting the corpse, by objectifying a human body, medical students are accepted into the society of doctors and that anatomy is essentially a lesson of hubris.

However, I added that a second lesson is actually the opposite: humility. I held the corpse’s hand and thought that it must have held a trowel, a child’s hand, or a pencil a thousand times. The body we dissected belonged to an elderly woman. She was covered with cancer, and yet there was still some residue of pink nail polish on her fingernails. Even though she was dying, she still loved painting her nails. It is impossible not to be humiliated by the complexity of the human body and the strength and endurance of the human mind.

I want to distinguish compassion from humility. There has been a lot of discussion about lack of compassion in medicine and all of this is perfectly justified. But compassion is recognizing another’s plight and wishing to alleviate it. Humility is the realization that they are all about the grace of God or neurotransmitters. Compassion creates care; Humility also creates respect.

It seems to me that many doctors lose sight of the principle of humility somewhere in their medical training, during the strenuous internship and assistantship or later during the years of practice. We speak encrypted and refer to patients based on their illness identity, such as “Mrs. X. is a 56 year old diabetic with peripheral neuropathy “instead of her actual identity as a teacher, musician or housewife. In fact, young doctors are practiced on rounds to be concise and to use as many doctoral words as possible instead of normal words.

We lose sight of or deny our own weakness and susceptibility to disease. Our patients see us as intact and invulnerable, and this illusion becomes part of our own consciousness. As I wrote in my anatomy paper, doctors draw a metaphorical line in the sand and expect death – or illness or ailment – to respect it.

Doctors are notoriously bad at treating themselves for physical and mental health problems. In one Study 2016 of more than 2,000 female doctors, almost half said they had a mental illness and had not sought help. The common reasons doctors cite for not seeking treatment are fears of admission, concerns about career advancement, and stigma among peers. To make one point, these doctors are over.

I think the fault is not with the regulatory authorities or hospital administrations, but with the culture of medicine. I suspect the people who are interested in the medical profession are precisely those who have the greatest fear of death, weakness, or vulnerability. What better way to fend off these than to stuff yourself to excess with knowledge about the body and define yourself as a caregiver?

Goffman’s book was from before the Civil Rights Act, the Women’s Movement, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Eliminating homosexuality as a mental disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. We have become more aware of some stigmata than others, which is not to say that we have removed them. It seems to me that stigmas die hard, and perhaps the stigma of people with mental illness is most persistent.

I hope that in my lifetime it will no longer be necessary to pass to be a member of a professional group, as I did in the peer supervision group. I hope doctors with mental illness will be able to seek help and share their findings without fear of condemnation or ostracism. I hope that the doctors can accept our weakness and humility as well as our knowledge and our power.

I believe we need to do this, not just because we owe it to ourselves and our colleagues, but because we owe it to our patients not to see them as a different class from ourselves. Treating them until then we people with mental illness are essentially “others” – in Goffman’s vocabulary as “not entirely human” – and give them a fake smile instead of a real one.

Susan T. Mahler is a psychiatrist in her own practice and the mother of two children.



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Chrissy Teigen Addresses Mental Health Issues After Being “canceled” – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth https://open-mind.org/chrissy-teigen-addresses-mental-health-issues-after-being-canceled-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ https://open-mind.org/chrissy-teigen-addresses-mental-health-issues-after-being-canceled-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/#respond Thu, 15 Jul 2021 07:05:02 +0000 https://open-mind.org/chrissy-teigen-addresses-mental-health-issues-after-being-canceled-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ Chrissy Teigen said she had “learned a great deal” about abandonment in the past two months. The cookbook author has to Instagram on July 14th to say she is at a loss for words as she tries to overcome recent allegations of bullying against her. “Iiiii don’t really know what to say here … it […]]]>


Chrissy Teigen said she had “learned a great deal” about abandonment in the past two months.

The cookbook author has to Instagram on July 14th to say she is at a loss for words as she tries to overcome recent allegations of bullying against her.

“Iiiii don’t really know what to say here … it just feels so weird to pretend nothing happened in this online world, but it totally sucks in real life,” wrote Teigen, 35, alongside a picture of yourself on the couch. “Going outside sucks and doesn’t feel right. Being home alone with my thoughts makes my depressed head race.”

In May she has apologized to Courtney Stodden over an abusive tweet from 2011 in which she said she was “ashamed and utterly embarrassed” about her previous behavior. After a month without social media, she returned in June with a long middle article to think about their actions. “There is not a day, not a single moment, that I have not felt the overwhelming weight of regret for the things I have said in the past,” she wrote in part.

Chrissy Teigen & John Legends Sweetest Family Moments Legend

According to her new Instagram post, Teigen has realized that the “I’m handling this now is not the right answer”.

So she decided to speak openly about the mental health challenges she has faced in the past few weeks to share what she has been through and wrote, “I feel lost and need to find my place to communicate with you guys instead of pretending everything is fine. I’m not used to it any other way !! ”

The former model who posted pictures of her Family vacation in Italy He recently talked about why “breaking up a club is a fascinating thing”. She pondered, “Few understand and it’s impossible to know until you’re in,” adding that it’s “hard” to talk about what she’s going through without sounding “tearful”, especially “when you’ve clearly done it”. Something wrong.”

She has come to the conclusion, “It just sucks. There is no profit.” As she shared with her 34 million followers: “All I know is that I love you, I miss you and I just needed an honest moment with you guys because I’m just sick of being sick with myself all day be. ”

Although she is ready to be “brutally taken apart,” she said, she “can’t do this quiet shit anymore!”

The same day Teigen apologized to Medium, fashion designer Michael Costello got in touch with further allegations against them. He said she accused him of “being a racist” in 2014 and tried to effectively blacklist him. “She told me that my career is over and from then on all my doors will be closed,” he wrote on Instagram, saying this had “traumatized, depressed and had suicidal thoughts”.

“They don’t deserve my goals. Nobody has them. Many of them needed empathy, kindness, understanding and support,” said Chirssy Teigen on Instagram, Derek Zagami and Natalie Lizarraga have the details.

Costello posted unchecked screenshots allegedly showing the couple’s Instagram DMs.

However, Teigen’s team told Business Insider Just days later, the screenshots shared by Costello were fake, indicating inconsistencies in Instagram formatting and an old profile photo of her. Costello’s rep then said E! News that Teigen “remains the same tyrant despite her public apology”.

Teigen later reached out to Costello directly, tweeting on June 18, “You are now causing real pain to people trying to improve themselves. Enough. Or that WILL go on. Not here, but a real dish. And every penny we win we will go to an anti-bullying charity that is focused on turning this S – t show into a positive. “She tried to refute his alleged DMs by taking her own alleged screenshots published that showed their harmless DM history.

man John Legend came to her defense at the time. “Chrissy apologized for her public tweets, but after apologizing, Mr. Costello made a DM exchange between them,” the Grammy winner tweeted. “This exchange was made up, completely faked, never happened.”

Legend pondered, “I encourage anyone who breathlessly spreads this lie to keep the same energy as they correct the records.”

Teigen released a statement made on her behalf, reiterating that she apologized for public tweets, stating that she had never “conspired” with anyone to harm Costello’s career. Read the full statement here.





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AltaPointe Receives Grant to Support Enhanced Mental Health and Treatment of Drug Use https://open-mind.org/altapointe-receives-grant-to-support-enhanced-mental-health-and-treatment-of-drug-use/ https://open-mind.org/altapointe-receives-grant-to-support-enhanced-mental-health-and-treatment-of-drug-use/#respond Wed, 14 Jul 2021 20:00:19 +0000 https://open-mind.org/altapointe-receives-grant-to-support-enhanced-mental-health-and-treatment-of-drug-use/ Posted: 07/14/2021 / 3:00 p.m. CDT / Updated: 07/14/2021 / 3:00 p.m. CDT AltaPointe press release Mobil, AL (July 14, 2021) – The Drug Abuse and Mental Health Agency (SAMHSA) awarded AltaPointe Health a grant this week that enables the health organization to implement the Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic (CCBHC) model for nursing. With […]]]>


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AltaPointe press release

Mobil, AL (July 14, 2021) – The Drug Abuse and Mental Health Agency (SAMHSA) awarded AltaPointe Health a grant this week that enables the health organization to implement the Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic (CCBHC) model for nursing.

With this new funding, AltaPointe has the opportunity to improve its service delivery by adding primary care to its full range of mental health, substance use and crisis services.

The CCBHC model guarantees access to 24/7/365 crisis care; Nursing coordination with hospitals, law enforcement agencies, and schools; and access to quality services, including drug treatment, to help stop the overdose crisis.

“AltaPointe is proud to partner with the National Council for Mental Wellbeing to improve access to holistic care and accelerate assessment and treatment in our community,” said Tuerk Schlesinger, CEO of AltaPointe Health. “This funding opens up new opportunities for our providers to deliver positive mental and physical health outcomes to the patients we care for today and in the years to come.”

AltaPointe joins 430 provider organizations across the country using the CCBHC model to better serve their community’s needs.



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How do forest fires in Western countries affect mental health? | Best states https://open-mind.org/how-do-forest-fires-in-western-countries-affect-mental-health-best-states/ https://open-mind.org/how-do-forest-fires-in-western-countries-affect-mental-health-best-states/#respond Tue, 13 Jul 2021 15:07:00 +0000 https://open-mind.org/how-do-forest-fires-in-western-countries-affect-mental-health-best-states/ This year’s fire season surpasses last year’s record season in California, consuming more than double the area burned at that time last year. In the Golden State and throughout the western United States, the fire season begins earlier and ends later, as more than, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection 4,900 […]]]>


This year’s fire season surpasses last year’s record season in California, consuming more than double the area burned at that time last year. In the Golden State and throughout the western United States, the fire season begins earlier and ends later, as more than, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection 4,900 fires have been on fire in the state since the beginning of the year and pose a widespread threat to communities across the region.

But aside from the devastating damage that fires can wreak in communities, experts are only just beginning to understand the mental health risks of fire and smoke, according to a recently published study report from the University of California – Los Angeles.

“Forest fires are increasing in frequency and severity every year, and the impact they have on people becomes more apparent every year,” one of the report’s authors, May MT Kyaw, said in a press release. “They displace entire communities and their smoke can affect regions hundreds of miles away for days, weeks, or months. However, very little is known about the impact of forest fires on mental health.”

The report comes after a 2019 meeting of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine sounded the alarm over the lack of research into the effects of forest fires on mental health, highlighting the “underestimated and under-explored” field.

As part of its analysis, the report examined “Solastalgie”, a term coined in 2005 by Australian sustainability professor Glenn Albrecht to describe a “location-based distress people experience when environments and landscapes change (but not necessarily lost) due to such events.” Environmental degradation and droughts, “reads the report, which has since been expanded to include forest fires. The suffering can range from” general exposure to serious health problems and problems including physical and mental illness and substance abuse “.

“After wildfire, residents returning to a devastated landscape are constantly reminded by the sight of their trauma, in addition to the financial, health, and social burdens of rebuilding homes and communities,” the report reads Losses That Can Lead to Solastalgia.

The report finds that climate change is responsible for increased “incidence, duration, and severity of forest fires,” with the fire season lasting longer and smoke spreading miles beyond the reach of a fire.

Understanding the psychological effects of forest fire smoke is crucial as the world enters a time when forest fire smoke events are long-lasting events, according to the report.

However, compared to understanding the mental health effects of forest fires, “understanding the mental health effects of wildland smoke is still in its infancy,” the report said.

Of the existing research on the effects of forest fire smoke on mental health, the report highlighted a study of children and adolescents exposed to smoke, suggesting that closeness and the perceived threat of fire are factors that affect stress and emotional well-being . Another study found that persistent smoke affected mental and emotional health after fires in the Canadian Northwest Territories. Parishioners reported fear, stress, isolation and insecurity, and a majority reported a “direct link between the forest fires and smoke and a decrease in their mental and emotional health” from being incarcerated at home.

The report also asks, “What if forest fires become chronic and persistent?” quote Australian bushfires 2019 and California’s 2020 wildfire season. In these cases in particular, the report concluded that exposure to wildland smoke may have implications for mental health, but notes that the literature is inconsistent.

David Eisenman, lead author of the report, compared isolation from forest fires and forest fire smoke conditions to lockdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Living under the lockdowns of the COVID-19 pandemic gives a sense of what it is like,” Eisenman said in a press release. “Isolation from the community and the fear of leaving home to venture into the outside world is inherently dangerous – this could sum up the isolating and frightening experience of the pandemic and ongoing forest fire smoke incidents.”



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Study: Long fire seasons raise concerns about the mental health of residents and responders https://open-mind.org/study-long-fire-seasons-raise-concerns-about-the-mental-health-of-residents-and-responders/ https://open-mind.org/study-long-fire-seasons-raise-concerns-about-the-mental-health-of-residents-and-responders/#respond Mon, 12 Jul 2021 00:07:57 +0000 https://open-mind.org/study-long-fire-seasons-raise-concerns-about-the-mental-health-of-residents-and-responders/ Firefighters fight the 2018 Woolsey Fire in Ventura County. Courtesy of the Ventura County Fire Department Climate change is leading to longer fire seasons and raising concerns about the psychological effects of prolonged exposure to forest fire smoke, according to a new report. Longer fire seasons pose a threat to communities threatened by the fire […]]]>


Firefighters fight the 2018 Woolsey Fire in Ventura County. Courtesy of the Ventura County Fire Department

Climate change is leading to longer fire seasons and raising concerns about the psychological effects of prolonged exposure to forest fire smoke, according to a new report.

Longer fire seasons pose a threat to communities threatened by the fire itself, and these changes can result in weeks or even months of smoke exposure in areas far from the fires.

After meeting at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, UCLA’s Center for Healthy Climate Solutions and Climate Resolve are working together to shed light on the mental and physical health effects of forest fires.

In the report, researchers say government, public health officials, and the public in general need to understand the mental health effects of forest fires as the world enters a time when events are prolonged.

“What happens when forest fires become chronic and persistent, as they did in Australia in 2019 and California in 2020?” David Eisenman from UCLA Fielding School of Public Health



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Forest fires, like the 2018 Woolsey Fire, fuel mental health anxiety and stress alongside the paths of devastation – Daily News https://open-mind.org/forest-fires-like-the-2018-woolsey-fire-fuel-mental-health-anxiety-and-stress-alongside-the-paths-of-devastation-daily-news/ https://open-mind.org/forest-fires-like-the-2018-woolsey-fire-fuel-mental-health-anxiety-and-stress-alongside-the-paths-of-devastation-daily-news/#respond Sat, 10 Jul 2021 12:00:24 +0000 https://open-mind.org/forest-fires-like-the-2018-woolsey-fire-fuel-mental-health-anxiety-and-stress-alongside-the-paths-of-devastation-daily-news/ “Forest fires occur with increasing frequency and severity each year, and the impact they have on people becomes more apparent each year. However, very little is known about how forest fires affect mental health. “ – from a UCLA-led research report released this week. They moved into Charley’s old house on my cul-de-sac a few […]]]>


“Forest fires occur with increasing frequency and severity each year, and the impact they have on people becomes more apparent each year. However, very little is known about how forest fires affect mental health. “ – from a UCLA-led research report released this week.

They moved into Charley’s old house on my cul-de-sac a few months before the 2018 Woolsey fire – a lovely middle-aged couple with a young daughter who played with all the kids in the neighborhood.

You moved out in March last year. They didn’t want to leave, they loved the neighborhood, but mentally they just couldn’t take another California wildfire season, they said.

A sign thanking the firefighters still hangs near Dan Blocker Beach in Malibu, California, June 25, 2019. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

They had barely finished unpacking and had settled in their new home in 2018 when they were ordered to evacuate immediately. Welcome to the neighborhood. Wildfire had come our way.

They were sitting in their car in a supermarket parking lot when the flames jumped over the 101 freeway at 2am at our exit. It was a coin toss where the swirling, howling winds of Santa Ana would take them.

If they blew east we would all lose our homes. If they blew west, they would destroy homes and other people’s dreams. They blew south in Malibu. Again.

“Thank God,” I said, feeling no guilt, just immense relief. I still had a house. When the smoke cleared weeks later, 1,643 families didn’t.

When we were allowed back inside, all the neighbors gathered in the middle of the cul-de-sac to talk about where we had gone and how close we were to losing our homes. The air was still thick with smoke.

“Does that happen often?” asked the new couple. We all laughed nervously. Often enough to worry every time the Santa Anas blow, we said, trying to downplay the truth. It happened far too often.

They were still living in the neighborhood in 2020, the largest forest fire year recorded in modern California history. If that wasn’t bad enough, all reports said 2021 could get worse.

That was it, they had enough. They put their house on the market and had three offers on the first day. We gave them a party, wished them luck, and said goodbye. Both of them could work remotely in their jobs, and they would homeschool their daughter until they found a place to call home without the stress of forest fires every year. They thought Colorado was nice. It was going to be an adventure, they told their little girl. It turned out to be a nightmare.

They were hardly out of LA County when their daughter burst into tears in the back seat. Couldn’t they just turn around and go back, she begged? Maybe there will be no more fires. She didn’t want to leave her friends, her home.

It broke her heart, but it was too late, said her mother. Their house was no longer theirs. From there the ride went downhill. All the places they wanted to visit as possible future homes have been big disappointments.

“We got lost in this depression,” she said a few weeks ago when she visited the old neighborhood and let her daughter play with her friends. “There were days when neither of us wanted to get up. We knew we had made a mistake. “

The woman who bought her house asked if they wanted to see what she had done with it? That was a mistake. They didn’t like anything she’d done to the place.

They only wanted to be in town for a few days before returning to Colorado. They had found a place in a small town outside of Boulder. It was nice, but smaller than they wanted, and there were no children for their daughter to play with.

“We’ll see,” she said, hugging everyone while her husband walked around and shook hands. Then they were gone. It was sad. They had traded one stress for another and lost their beloved home in the process.

“We need more research to understand the impact of these experiences as the threat from forest fires increases,” said the UCLA-led report.

You can start in my neighborhood.

Dennis McCarthy’s column runs on Sunday. He can be reached at dmccarthynews@gmail.com.



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