Mental Health – Open Mind http://open-mind.org/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 10:35:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://open-mind.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6-150x150.png Mental Health – Open Mind http://open-mind.org/ 32 32 Durham is launching a new program to help people with behavioral and mental health issues https://open-mind.org/durham-is-launching-a-new-program-to-help-people-with-behavioral-and-mental-health-issues/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 10:35:24 +0000 https://open-mind.org/durham-is-launching-a-new-program-to-help-people-with-behavioral-and-mental-health-issues/ DURHAM, NC (WTVD) — A new focus on crisis response in Durham. The city is the first in the state to create an “unarmed mental health” department. The new program starts on Tuesday. The goal is to tailor 911 responses to the needs of people suffering from behavioral and mental health issues. Durham is the […]]]>
DURHAM, NC (WTVD) — A new focus on crisis response in Durham.

The city is the first in the state to create an “unarmed mental health” department.

The new program starts on Tuesday.

The goal is to tailor 911 responses to the needs of people suffering from behavioral and mental health issues.

Durham is the first North Carolina city to deploy unarmed mental health professionals.

The city’s Community Safety Department is launching three new crisis response pilot programs.

Mental health clinicians will be embedded in the Durham Emergency Communications Center on Tuesday.

This department for emergency calls is designed to quickly connect residents to a psychiatrist.

The second program, Community Response Teams, will launch on Wednesday.

Unarmed three-person teams are dispatched as first responders when 911 calls are received regarding nonviolent mental illness or quality of life concerns.

Then on Thursday, the city will roll out the Care Navigation Program.

This provides in-person and telephone follow-up by clinicians and peer support 48 hours after an individual meets with one of the pilot program responders.

A co-response pilot will begin later in the year, pairing clinicians with law enforcement officers to respond to behavioral health 911 calls, which pose a greater potential safety concern.

Copyright © 2022 WTVD-TV. All rights reserved.

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Can women with bipolar disorder have children? https://open-mind.org/can-women-with-bipolar-disorder-have-children/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 00:18:32 +0000 https://open-mind.org/can-women-with-bipolar-disorder-have-children/ Parenting with bipolar disorder presents unique challenges. Your family can thrive with personal health management and open communication. Becoming a parent is often associated with fears and unknowns. If you live with bipolar disorder, you may have concerns about the stigma, caring for your children, and experiencing mood swings. Many people with bipolar disorder have […]]]>

Parenting with bipolar disorder presents unique challenges. Your family can thrive with personal health management and open communication.

Becoming a parent is often associated with fears and unknowns. If you live with bipolar disorder, you may have concerns about the stigma, caring for your children, and experiencing mood swings.

Many people with bipolar disorder have healthy, loving relationships and stable family environments. Stability is often achieved through management of bipolar disorder and educating loved ones, including children, about the condition.

Parenting can be difficult for anyone, but living with bipolar disorder can introduce nuance. People with bipolar disorder often have to manage their treatment—including medication and talk therapy—while caring for a child.

Living with bipolar disorder can also mean managing triggers and buffering mood episodes with therapy and a healthy routine.

A 2017 meta-analysis of studies found that people with bipolar disorder have more stressful life events prior to an episode of mania or depression. The paper included childbirth as a stressful life event and found that people with bipolar disorder were more likely to cause relapse than other mental illnesses, such as mental illness. B. severe depression.

People with bipolar disorder can be loving and present parents. Even if living with bipolar disorder, parents can provide the care and attention children need into adulthood.

A parent with bipolar disorder may have different relationships with their children than people without bipolar disorder, so family dynamics can be nuanced.

A 2020 Review of Studies on Bipolar Disorder and Family Environments found that parents reported less cohesiveness in their families than parents of households in which mental illness was not identified.

However, the paper also found that the impact of bipolar disorder on the family setting was not significantly different from that of other mental health diagnoses.

Likelihood of passing on bipolar disorder to children

Family history may play a role in risk of developing bipolar disorder. However, children of people with bipolar will not always get the condition.

A 2018 Review of Studies found that there is a 40 to 70 percent chance that both identical twins will have bipolar disorder if one has it. The same review found there was a 5% to 10% chance that a child or sibling of someone with bipolar disorder would also develop the condition (7 times higher than the general population).

However, the review finds that these relatives are actually more likely to develop depression than bipolar disorder, even if they have a close family member with bipolar disorder.

Many people with bipolar disorder make excellent parents. But it’s understandable to have concerns and fears when embarking on a parenting journey. Knowing that others with bipolar disorder share your concerns can help you feel validated.

Bipolar Disorder and Pregnancy: What You Should Know First

A Study 2016 collected the comments of women with bipolar disorder regarding pregnancy. These women had many concerns, including:

  • How drug side effects, like obesity, can increase birth complications
  • That they may relapse or have a mood episode as a result of pregnancy and childbirth
  • Stigmatized as mothers with mental illness
  • Infants need to be bottle-fed to protect them from bipolar disorder drugs like lithium
  • Coping with sleep deprivation while caring for a newborn, which is a known trigger for mood episodes

Study participants found that having a supportive family and partner helped alleviate some of these fears.

There is evidence that pregnancy does not affect the course of bipolar disorder.

A 2021 study found no difference in the progression of bipolar disorder in pregnant versus non-pregnant women. The study reached this conclusion by analyzing daily mood scores. A Study 2019 also found no difference in pregnancy outcomes between women with bipolar disorder and those without.

Still a 2016 Review of Studies found that women with bipolar disorder had poorer pregnancy outcomes than women without bipolar disorder.

As someone with bipolar disorder, you may want to make the most informed decisions for yourself. As part of this journey, you may want to reflect on how the symptoms of bipolar disorder can impact your life as a parent.

To dive deeper into this topic, you can listen to our podcast, Inside Bipolar Podcast: Pregnancy Considerations with Bipolar Disorder.

Symptom: Episodes of manic excitement

Some people associate excitement with an episode of mania. But one Study 2018 of 583 people with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia found that agitation was internally experienced more often than:

  • tension
  • restlessness
  • discomfort

agitation did occur in this group with an average of 22 mild episodes per year.

In this study, about two-thirds of the participants could tell when they were experiencing or about to experience restlessness. Many people sought medical help. Others tried to control themselves by talking to friends, family, their doctor, or by sticking to their medication.

While excitement might be a personally Warning signs of a manic episode may help to talk to a psychologist about learning to recognize clinical signs of mania. You may want to explore self-management techniques you can use to balance your experience with your role as a parent.

Symptom: Depressive episode, lack of motivation

Treating bipolar depression can be complex because the medications for depression and depression in bipolar disorder are different. For example, if a patient is given an antidepressant instead of a mood stabilizer, researcher Note that this can sometimes make symptoms worse, e.g. B. if someone has:

As a parent and as an individual, your self-care is important. If you experience lack of motivation or thoughts of harming yourself, contact a doctor or local emergency services.

A daily routine can help you feel more motivated if you are suffering from bipolar depression.

Symptom: Tendency to have euthymic periods

In a time of euthymia (du-leg-me-uh), or if it’s you Not When you experience a mood episode, you can welcome the break from the symptoms. During this time, you may also choose to take on important responsibilities as a parent and as a person managing a mental illness.

A euthymic state can occur when you discuss bipolar disorder with your child. You can also take steps to treat bipolar disorder, such as: For example, keep a mood journal and make a plan for how others can help if you experience a future mood episode.

Symptom: Psychosis and unforeseen triggers

Sometimes you can’t predict when a mood episode will occur. When you are suffering from psychosis, your family can be an important support system.

Psychosis is when someone with bipolar disorder:

  • delusions
  • hallucinations
  • wrong beliefs

Psychosis can be part of a manic or depressive state. include examples believing you have special powers or are financially ruined.

As a parent, it helps to make sure you have a mental health contingency plan in place for times like these. Talking to your child about the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) officers can make the episode less scary and more manageable for them, especially if they don’t have the support of another parent or family member.

It’s a good idea to discuss with your child how to deal with crisis episodes. Try to make a list of people you can call when this happens so they can get the help they need. The list can include not only emergency personnel, but also friends and family who you trust and who understand your family situation.

People with bipolar disorder can and do become caring and responsible parents. It’s understandable to have fears and insecurities beginning a pregnancy or parenting journey. By managing your health and developing contingency plans, you can create a healthy environment in which your family can thrive.

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Telemedicine visits for mental health continue to increase, although they have declined in all other specialties https://open-mind.org/telemedicine-visits-for-mental-health-continue-to-increase-although-they-have-declined-in-all-other-specialties/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 18:16:31 +0000 https://open-mind.org/telemedicine-visits-for-mental-health-continue-to-increase-although-they-have-declined-in-all-other-specialties/ The explosive use of virtual care in the early months of the pandemic has seen a dramatic decline in all but one specialty – mental health. In fact, the use of telemedicine among mentally ill people continues to increase, according to a new study report. For the report, healthcare appointment booking platform Zocdoc, used by […]]]>

The explosive use of virtual care in the early months of the pandemic has seen a dramatic decline in all but one specialty – mental health. In fact, the use of telemedicine among mentally ill people continues to increase, according to a new study report.

For the report, healthcare appointment booking platform Zocdoc, used by millions of patients each month, examined appointments booked on its platform from May 2020 to May 2022. In May 2020, a third of appointments were telemedicine visits, and a year later it dropped to 17%. Mental health aside, only 9% of appointments in the last month were done virtually.

In contrast, when the use of telemedicine for psychiatric appointments was studied, the numbers tell a different story. As of May 2020, 74% of mental health appointments booked on Zocdoc were virtual. It rose to 85% in May 2021 and 87% in May 2022.

Virtual mental health visits will continue to grow, said Richard Fine, Zocdoc’s chief commercial officer. He said while all other specialties have shifted back to in-person care, mental health is shifting even more toward telemedicine.

“The conversational nature of mental health appointments — and the discretion, ease, and efficiency of speaking to a therapist from home without a commute — means that telemedicine will likely remain the patient’s first choice for mental health care,” he said .

Zocdoc surveyed patients about their attitudes toward virtual visits, and respondents indicated that they prefer telemedicine to in-person mental health care because the modality is more convenient and allows them to save more time and money. Not having to commute to an in-person visit often means a patient doesn’t have to pay for transportation or take time off work.

The convenience that telemedicine brings to those seeking mental health care comes at a crucial time. Forty percent of US adults to report Anxiety and Depression Symptoms and Providers to report a 93 percent increase in patients seeking resources for their anxiety. Because telemedicine appointments often allow patients to see a provider faster than if they had in-person care, the urgent need for mental health care is another reason why the specialty is using telemedicine more than the others.

The report also showed that the easing of Covid-19 protocols and the return to in-person settings have not prompted the mentally ill to seek in-person care. Among patients who booked a virtual mental health visit with a new provider, fewer than 5 percent booked an in-person follow-up appointment. For comparison, this percentage ranged from 50 to 60 for patients who booked a telemedicine visit with a new gynecologist, ophthalmologist, or dentist.

Aside from the telemedicine boom in mental health, virtual care has steadily fizzled out alongside every other specialty since the early months of the pandemic, but the modality still accounts for significantly more visits than it did before Covid-19. As of February 2020, less than 1% of Zocdoc’s bookings involved telemedicine, according to Fine.

Patients cited avoidance of Covid-19 and adherence to infection control protocols as the top reasons for seeking telehealth care in the early months of the pandemic. Now that 77% of US adults are vaccinated and most pandemic protocols have been relaxed, providers and patients are viewing the widespread use of telemedicine across all modalities as “a complement to in-person care, not a substitute for it,” Fine said.

Seventy-seven percent of patients surveyed by Zocdoc believed they would use a combination of telemedicine and in-person care in the future, and 83% of providers who survived said the future of healthcare will involve a mix of these modalities of care.

Copyright: Olga Strelnikova, Getty Images

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How Pastors Can Help • Biblical Recorder https://open-mind.org/how-pastors-can-help-biblical-recorder/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 14:30:01 +0000 https://open-mind.org/how-pastors-can-help-biblical-recorder/ The growing Gen Z mental health crisis is being felt across the country – in schools, families and churches. The American Academy of Pediatrics, the Children’s Hospital Association, and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry recently declared this crisis a national emergency. As a pastor or church leader, you may have a unique […]]]>

The growing Gen Z mental health crisis is being felt across the country – in schools, families and churches. The American Academy of Pediatrics, the Children’s Hospital Association, and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry recently declared this crisis a national emergency. As a pastor or church leader, you may have a unique opportunity to work alongside educators and parents to make a difference in the lives of young people struggling with mental health.

The Springtide Research Institute recently published sobering results on the mental health trends of Generation Z (13-25 years) two years after COVID-19.

Research found that teenagers and young adults feel extremely depressed, anxious, stressed, and lonely. Over half of young people (53%) said the biggest challenge they faced during the pandemic was their mental health. Almost half of young people (48%) report being moderately or extremely depressed. Another in four say they are extremely stressed (25%). And 1 in 5 say they are extremely anxious (26%) or extremely lonely (21%). Worse, 6 in 10 young people (61%) say adults in their lifetime don’t really know the extent of their struggles. Among them are 59% of the young Protestants.

These trends are not necessarily new. Experts have been monitoring America’s “loneliest” generation and their mental health since before the pandemic. Gen Z faces the normal challenges of typical adolescent insecurities. But there’s really no “normal” to go back to after the pandemic. Their worlds were turned upside down just as they were beginning to find their footing.

We can gradually understand that these years of her life are not belated opportunities and events, like an adult returning to a familiar office with a steady job. Adolescents often lack entire development markers and moments – formative and singular events that in many cases cannot easily be made up for or replaced. And often these losses are coupled and amplified by the loss of support systems that would normally help them thrive in times of uncertainty or growth. Essentially, the pandemic wasn’t just a speed bump in her life. It was a sudden and dramatic left turn.

Anyone working with Gen Z is facing a mental health crisis in this generation on a level they have never seen before.

In Springtide’s new report Mental Health & Gen Z: What Educators Need to Know, Springtide Executive Director Dr. Josh Packardunpacks a heavy burden that is familiar to both faith leaders and educators working with young people.

“Over the last decade, many teachers have been trained to spot the warning signs of mental health crises in our students, point them to resources, and review them regularly—all while doing the thousands of other things that make up our work.” make out,” says Packard. “But sometimes it doesn’t work. We don’t see. We are too busy or too untrained, or the situation is simply beyond our ability to see and react to.”

This typical approach – which focuses on surveillance and individual crisis intervention where necessary – is still critical work. But what if twice as many students get into the crisis? An already challenging task can easily become overwhelming. For many churches, there simply are not enough trusted adults to meet the growing need. So the answer is to focus time and resources on building a culture that is beneficial to mental health and goes beyond crisis response.

There are a number of actions that faith leaders and communities can take to begin caring for young people in ways that mitigate mental health issues before they become crises. Some of these are pragmatic — staying in touch, offering referrals to mental health professionals, and financial help with counseling costs. While these pragmatic things are crucial, research shows that young people need more.

A key finding of the Springtide Mental Health Study is that young people who feel included in a community say they “thrive strongly” in their mental health, at significantly higher rates than those who don’t feel included feel. Of course, belonging isn’t just the result of well-designed programs. It’s also a function of highly relational practices like knowing their names, acknowledging their presence and absence, remembering details they’ve shared about their lives, and—especially for this generation—being aware of their identity and them value (e.g. racial or ethnic). .

A 2020 Springtide report showed a pattern in young people’s stories as they journey from first joining to experiences of belonging. As they spoke, three distinct feelings kept coming up: feeling noticed, being named, and feeling known. This pattern reappeared in interviews for this report. This pattern of going from noticed to named to known is known as known belonging process.

Young people initially enter into relationships, groups and organizations because of certain things they have in common – shared interests, values, beliefs, practices, vocations or occupations. But they stay in those relationships when they feel like they belong. Pastors and church leaders should lead the way in cultivating a sense of belonging for young people.

Here are three actions pastors can take to foster a stronger sense of belonging among young people in your church:

1. Look for outliers

Consider young people who are likely to be prone to it Not feel they are part of your church community – perhaps minorities, people with withdrawn personalities, or people who participate unevenly. Assess what you can do to help these students.

2. Consider assigning adult mentors to your students

Be it an elder or deacon, a co-worker, or someone whose children are grown, this adult can be someone with whom students can connect beyond typical church activities. These mentors do not have to be trained psychiatrists, but they should be willing to listen and ready to help a student find the resources they need.

3. Provide mental health first aid awareness training to students

When it comes to conversations about mental health, young people naturally turn to each other. The more peer connections they have, the better. But beyond that, you can empower young people to help one another. Students can be better equipped to help their friends and, more importantly, know when to raise a concern with a trusted adult. Mental Health First Aid is an organization that offers this training.

Many churches are doing a good job helping Gen Z to feel recognized, named and known on a fundamental level. However, there are important places where pastors can seek to dig deeper into this dynamic and truly create a sense of belonging that leads to connectedness. Taking action to build connections in your youth group or college ministry is a surefire way to create an environment that is, at its core, conducive to mental health.

This article first appeared here.

(EDITORS NOTE – Jamieson Taylor is a freelance writer who works in media and public relations for Springtide Research Institute. Kevin Singer is director of media and public relations for Springtide Research Institute and teaches religious studies courses at community colleges. He was involved in North American Church Planting Mission Board from 2009-14.)

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This overlooked mental health “hack” increases your chance of living longer https://open-mind.org/this-overlooked-mental-health-hack-increases-your-chance-of-living-longer/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 14:00:25 +0000 https://open-mind.org/this-overlooked-mental-health-hack-increases-your-chance-of-living-longer/ The interest is great — and cash — in innovations designed to help us live longer. Thousands of dollars have been invested in Silicon Valley efforts such as “anti-aging nootropics” and “rejuvenation” startups to reverse the aging process. But new research published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society suggests there’s an overlooked longevity […]]]>

The interest is great — and cash — in innovations designed to help us live longer. Thousands of dollars have been invested in Silicon Valley efforts such as “anti-aging nootropics” and “rejuvenation” startups to reverse the aging process.

But new research published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society suggests there’s an overlooked longevity hack that’s consistently associated with longer living and general well-being: optimism.

Hearing that you live longer when you’re optimistic might sound a bit like hearing that you’re healthier when you eat your broccoli. However, the researchers behind this study say their findings should motivate individuals to redefine how they approach wellbeing. In addition, optimism should be seen as an approach to better health.

“Since evidence from randomized controlled trials suggests that interventions can increase optimism, optimism may be an important target of interventions to promote longevity and healthy aging in different groups,” first author Hayami Koga tells me.

Koga is a Ph.D. Candidate at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health.

“We tend to focus on the negative risk factors that affect our health,” says Koga.

“I hope people will think about the importance of positive resources like optimism that can benefit our health – especially when we see these benefits being seen across racial and ethnic groups.”

What optimism really means

In science, being called optimistic doesn’t mean you’re overly cheerful or always wear rose-colored glasses. Instead, optimists have a general expectation that good things will happen and believe that although bad things happen, those negative moments don’t outweigh the positive ones.

A number of studies suggest that greater optimism is associated with better mental and physical health. Previous research has also linked optimism to greater odds of achieving “extraordinary longevity,” described as living at age 85 or older.

In a previous study, Koga and colleagues found the same result, but they looked at a predominantly white population. For this new paper, they expanded the pool of participants to include women representing different racial and ethnic groups.

A total of 159,255 women between the ages of 50 and 79 were included in the study. The researchers then followed the women for up to 26 years, asking them about lifestyle factors like diet and exercise, and their optimism.

According to the study, the most optimistic women in the study lived 5.4 percent longer and were 10 percent more likely to live past their 90s than the least optimistic women.

It’s important to note that healthy lifestyle choices also contributed to these participants’ overall health, but optimism topped the list as the main factor behind the difference between the two groups, the study found. Previous studies also suggest that optimistic people are more likely to exhibit healthy behaviors, such as not smoking.

Can you cultivate optimism?

While your likelihood of being optimistic is slightly influenced by genetics, optimism is also shaped by social influences.

In turn, systemic issues like racism can affect the likelihood of feeling optimistic. In fact, the CDC describes racism as “a fundamental contributor to racial and ethnic health disparities.” But people who are optimistic are more likely to live longer, regardless of their background. Koga believes this result is partly why the study is so powerful.

The new study found that the benefits of optimism go beyond race and ethnicity.

“Understanding how potential preventive factors work across racial and ethnic groups to improve health is crucial,” she says.

Ultimately, given the right circumstances, you can become more optimistic.

An intervention supported by randomized controlled trials is referred to as a best self-intervention.

It’s about “identifying goals and then imagining a future in which everything went well and the goals were achieved,” says Koga. It really increases optimism in most people.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is also known to increase optimism, Koga says. This form of therapy typically involves practices that help a person avoid unhelpful or unproductive ways of thinking and change their behavioral patterns.

Some studies also suggest that practicing gratitude can increase optimism. Thinking about what’s going right in your life can help rebalance your perspective — and dampen pessimistic thoughts

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Berks Officials Discuss Mental Health and Social Media as Part of School Safety | Berk’s Regional News https://open-mind.org/berks-officials-discuss-mental-health-and-social-media-as-part-of-school-safety-berks-regional-news/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 05:22:00 +0000 https://open-mind.org/berks-officials-discuss-mental-health-and-social-media-as-part-of-school-safety-berks-regional-news/ READING, Pa. – School safety was the focus in Berks County on Thursday. State and district leaders, along with District Attorney John Adams, sat down with school administrators and first responders to discuss mental health and improving classroom safety. The disagreement was in direct response to the recent tragedy in Uvalde, Texas. “The threat is […]]]>

READING, Pa. – School safety was the focus in Berks County on Thursday.

State and district leaders, along with District Attorney John Adams, sat down with school administrators and first responders to discuss mental health and improving classroom safety. The disagreement was in direct response to the recent tragedy in Uvalde, Texas.

“The threat is serious,” said Berks County Commissioner Christian Leinbach. “It is real.”

Important interest groups from the entire district came together for the round table discussion. Though school safety and emergency preparedness are discussed annually, officials say the plans are evolving as the mass shootings increase.

“I would say the big shift that we’ve seen across the education community has to do with social media,” said Jill Hackman, executive director of the Berks County Intermediate Unit.

Hackman says social media and communications have expanded over the years, and she vowed her team will continue to monitor her for red flags and red flags.

“It’s about the continued commitment to our training, preparation and communication,” she said. “Those are the priority areas.”

Mental health was another important aspect of the forum.

“It has been highlighted that it is very difficult to get services for parents who may have children who need a psychological evaluation,” Leinbach said. “Human resources is a huge problem.”

Leinbach says that with these mental health issues come financial concerns.

“Schools have made it clear to the state that they need help with household issues related to mental health and also school safety,” he said.

In a survey of parents, Leinbach says the number one concern for their children is classroom safety. He calls it a disheartening realization that he’s committed to change.

“We’re going to set up a follow-up meeting,” he said, “and leading up to that meeting there will be a number of subcommittees looking at a number of issues.”

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Take care of your mental health, especially if you have pulmonary hypertension https://open-mind.org/take-care-of-your-mental-health-especially-if-you-have-pulmonary-hypertension/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 14:00:53 +0000 https://open-mind.org/take-care-of-your-mental-health-especially-if-you-have-pulmonary-hypertension/ As the co-moderator of the Pulmonary Hypertension News Forum, I have inspired and participated in many hot topics over the past three years. During that time, I’ve noticed that a theme comes up often and always gets great responses. Mental health and well-being inspires a conversation that patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and their caregivers […]]]>

As the co-moderator of the Pulmonary Hypertension News Forum, I have inspired and participated in many hot topics over the past three years. During that time, I’ve noticed that a theme comes up often and always gets great responses.

Mental health and well-being inspires a conversation that patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and their caregivers often prefer to have with each other rather than with someone outside the PH community.

Why is that? Perhaps our perception of society’s expectations causes anxiety, stress, and depression. When we unconsciously start treating these imagined external expectations as law while trying to combat a serious illness, it’s easy to become overwhelmed.

Something as small as an unmade bed, a skipped shower, a takeout instead of home-cooked, or some other small task left uncompleted can turn a physically bad day into an emotionally difficult day.

Literature Recommendations

My son was diagnosed with PH at the age of 8 and had a heart and double lung transplant six years later. As his supervisor, I feel pressured to do more than I can handle in a day.

Some of the questions I sometimes ask myself to shake off fear: Whose expectations am I trying to meet? My own or someone else’s? Who but myself will notice my lack of accomplishment? Why can’t I do a little now and a little later? Who says I have to do things a certain way?

I recently read something that made my questions feel validated.

A 2020 post by social media blogger Kate Scott went viral when she responded to a question on Quora, a question-and-answer website.

The question was, “Has a therapist ever said something completely unexpected to you?” Kate’s response was, “Run the dishwasher twice.”

She explained that during one session her therapist asked her what she was struggling with. Kate was embarrassed that she had nothing profound to say other than the simple truth. “Honestly? The dishes. It’s stupid I know but the more I look at them the more I CAN’T do them because I have to scrub them before I put them in the dishwasher because the dishwasher sucks and I do just can’t stand scrubbing the dishes.”

She expected even her therapist to judge her for it, but instead he nodded understandingly and calmly suggested, “Run the dishwasher twice.”

He pointed out that there’s no rule that says she can’t run her dishwasher more than once.

She returned home and no longer conformed to arbitrary rules, which ironically helped her achieve things again.

Only when she was in a healthier place would she rinse her dishes and put them back in the dishwasher properly, eliminating the need for a second run.

Kate’s conclusion is compelling. “But at a time when life was a struggle instead of a blessing, I learned an incredibly important lesson: There are no rules. Run the dishwasher twice.”

I highly recommend reading Kate’s full post. It’s worth reading! Then ask yourself, “What arbitrary rules can I break to make tough days feel less overwhelming?”

I’m taking this advice by tackling some big tasks that I’ve put off because I’ve convinced myself they needed to be done quickly. Reminding myself that I can accomplish big things with small steps has helped me put a big dent in a previously untouched pile of to-dos.

That being said, I hope PH patients will consider their physical challenges and peacefully accept that there is no rule against rest. In your case in particular, it is often necessary, and the only person who needs convincing is you. If someone tells you otherwise, suggest that they make and follow their own rules and leave it to your own devices.


Note: News about pulmonary hypertension is solely a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always consult your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with questions about any medical condition. Never disregard or delay in seeking professional medical advice because you have read something on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of News about pulmonary hypertension or its parent company, BioNews, and is intended to stimulate discussion of issues related to pulmonary hypertension.

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Since COVID-19, 21% of American adults are living with a mental disorder – as it varies by age https://open-mind.org/since-covid-19-21-of-american-adults-are-living-with-a-mental-disorder-as-it-varies-by-age/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://open-mind.org/since-covid-19-21-of-american-adults-are-living-with-a-mental-disorder-as-it-varies-by-age/ This post was originally published on this site Written by Judy Campbell March 11, 2022 marked the second anniversary of the World Health Organization’s official statement on the COVID-19 pandemic. According to a WHO survey of 130 countries, the devastating impact of COVID-19 included the disruption of mental health services in 93% of countries worldwide. […]]]>

This post was originally published on this site

Written by Judy Campbell

March 11, 2022 marked the second anniversary of the World Health Organization’s official statement on the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to a WHO survey of 130 countries, the devastating impact of COVID-19 included the disruption of mental health services in 93% of countries worldwide. Data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration also shows that more than one in five American adults suffered from a mental illness in 2020.

Sidecar Health examined how the prevalence of mental health disorders breaks down by age, citing SAMHSA data that aggregated survey data from Q1 and Q4 on mental health in 2020 and survey data that specifically focused on the mental health impact of the pandemic .

Mental illness encompasses various conditions of varying severity and can be divided into two broad categories: all mental illness (AMI), which includes all recognized mental illnesses; and severe mental illness, a more severe subgroup of AMI that affects or limits activities of daily living.

Stigma, prejudice and discrimination against people with mental illness have created significant barriers to care. According to data from Mental Health America, in 2020, fewer than half of people with mental health disorders received treatment, often out of fear of judgment from family, friends, or co-workers. Read on to see how the severity of mental illness affected three age groups in American adults.

Daisies Daisies // Shutterstock

Adults aged 18-25

– People with mental disorders: 30.6%

— 29.3% of adults between 18 and 20 years old

— 31.3% of adults between 21 and 25

– Individuals reporting significant adverse mental health impacts due to the pandemic:

— Among all respondents: 23.2%

— People with mental disorders: 48.5%

— People with severe mental disorders: 52.7%

The American Psychological Association’s 2020 Stress in America survey found that the US faces a national mental health crisis that requires strategic problem solving.

Gen Z adults (ages 18-23) faced additional challenges in 2020 as they entered the workforce while the economy was in freefall due to a lack of face-to-face connections with colleagues, classmates and loved ones. This age group is already at high risk of mental illness due to ongoing insecurities and high levels of stress.

Online surveys conducted in April 2020 of 195 Texas college students found that the top stressor during the pandemic was concerns about their health and the health of their loved ones. Beyond mental health issues, Gen Z adults also reported adverse health effects from the pandemic, including poor sleep habits, poor diet, and weight fluctuations.

Josep Suria // Shutterstock

Adults aged 26-49

– People with mental disorders: 25.3%

— 27.4% of adults 26-29

— 29.0% of adults between 30 and 34 years

— 25.2% of adults 35-39

— 22.3% of adults 40-44

— 22.2% of adults 45-49

– Individuals reporting significant adverse mental health impacts due to the pandemic:

— Among all respondents: 21.4%

— People with mental disorders: 45.5%

— People with severe mental disorders: 54.6%

According to a 2019 report by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association (BCBSA), before the pandemic, there was a 47% increase in major depression diagnoses among millennials. As of October 2020, the BCBSA reported increases in certain behaviors, including alcohol use (34% increase), smoking (20% increase), vaping (17% increase), and non-medical drug use (16% increase).

Anxiety in 2022 is affecting the daily lives of more than half of millennials, according to a February 2022 study by Ramsey Solutions for The State of Mental Health.

Dragana Gordic // Shutterstock

Adults over 50

– People with mental disorders: 14.5%

— 19.2% of adults 50-54

— 17.8% of adults 55-59

— 13.5% of adults between 60 and 64 years of age

— 11.8% of adults aged 65 and over

– Individuals reporting significant adverse mental health impacts due to the pandemic:

— Among all respondents: 14.2%

— People with mental disorders: 43%

— Persons with severe mental health disorders: insufficient data

In the first six months of the pandemic, workers over the age of 55 were 17% more likely to be fired than their younger counterparts. This put a strain on financial security in retirement and the loss of necessary benefits in this phase of life.

This story originally appeared on Sidecar Health and was produced and
distributed in partnership with Stacker Studio.

This story was written by Stacker and has been re-released under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.

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Free child psychiatric training for pediatrics https://open-mind.org/free-child-psychiatric-training-for-pediatrics/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 14:34:33 +0000 https://open-mind.org/free-child-psychiatric-training-for-pediatrics/ NEW YORK, NY, June 07, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The increasing demand for child mental health services is putting immense pressure on already underfunded and inadequate systems. There is pressure for pediatric providers to take a larger role in addressing these concerns, but many providers feel unprepared. The REACH Institute, a 501c3 non-profit organization dedicated […]]]>

NEW YORK, NY, June 07, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The increasing demand for child mental health services is putting immense pressure on already underfunded and inadequate systems. There is pressure for pediatric providers to take a larger role in addressing these concerns, but many providers feel unprepared. The REACH Institute, a 501c3 non-profit organization dedicated to ensuring that the most effective, scientifically proven mental health care reaches all children and families, offers a solution.

Since 2006, REACH has trained pediatric primary care providers (PCPs), therapists, and healthcare facilities across the country in the most advanced evidence-based therapies for children’s mental health. Their flagship program, Patient-Centered Mental Health in Primary Care Pediatrics (PPP), trains providers to safely diagnose, treat, and manage common child mental health problems they encounter every day in the practice, thereby increasing referrals to behavioral health professionals be avoided for more complex cases.

Thanks to a generous donation, REACH is now able to offer free mental health training to up to 150 primary care physicians practicing in the Atlanta area. “We are so grateful for this opportunity to provide better access to mental health care for thousands of families across the Atlanta area,” said REACH CEO Lisa Hunter Romanelli, Ph.D. “REACH has already trained over 5,000 pediatric GPs, but we are just getting started.”

Led by experts in child psychiatry, psychology and pediatrics, REACH’s PPP training course teaches clinicians how to properly identify and differentiate behavioral health problems in children such as ADHD, anxiety (including PTSD), depression, bipolar disorder, oppositional and behavioral disorders. and psychosis. Participants also learn how to effectively administer psychopharmacology and create treatment plans.

As more providers are willing to address both physical and mental health issues, access to mental health care will improve for hundreds of thousands of families sitting on mental health care waiting lists or, worse, trapped in the emergency room for days, weeks, even months until a place at a mental health facility becomes available. To alleviate this crisis, REACH also offers grant opportunities for PCPs in the US and Canada who work in underserved communities and are representative of the diverse families they serve.

“Prevention is key,” says Dr. Hunter Romanelli. “When mental health screenings become part of every visit to healthy children, providers have a better chance of catching a problem early, before it reaches the frightening proportions we see in the news every day.”

To be considered for the free mental health training opportunity, applicants must be a pediatrician, primary care physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant practicing in the greater Atlanta area. Candidates of all backgrounds and life experiences are encouraged to apply. For more information, see: https://thereachinstitute.research.net/r/RQVCLHS

To learn more about REACH grant opportunities and other training programs for pediatric primary care physicians, psychotherapists, educators and nurses in the US and Canada, or to schedule PPP training for your healthcare facility, visit: www.thereachinstitute.org

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The REACH Institute is a 501c3 non-profit organization dedicated to ensuring that the most effective, scientifically proven mental health care reaches all children and families. Led by national experts in child psychiatry, psychology and pediatrics, since 2006 REACH has increased the country’s ability to help families with mental health problems. Their evidence-based training programs equip primary care providers, mental health clinicians, healthcare facilities, educators, and caregivers about the most advanced therapies to better diagnose, treat, and manage mental health problems in children and adults. REACH’s flagship course, Patient-Centered Mental Health in Pediatric Primary Care (PPP), has trained over 5,000 pediatric GPs to date. Better trained providers mean better access for hundreds of thousands of suffering families. To learn more about the REACH Institute and its training programs, visit: www.thereachinstitute.org

        
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Bakersfield’s First-Ever 911 Dispatcher Tasked with Delivering Mental Health Care | news https://open-mind.org/bakersfields-first-ever-911-dispatcher-tasked-with-delivering-mental-health-care-news/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 22:30:00 +0000 https://open-mind.org/bakersfields-first-ever-911-dispatcher-tasked-with-delivering-mental-health-care-news/ Delphina Rojo never imagined going into psychiatry. But after gaining years of experience at Kern Behavioral Health & Recovery Services and a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from CSUB, Rojo is now taking Bakersfield’s first position as a recovery specialist tasked with handling 911 calls that certain Fulfill criteria. She provides psychiatric services for the […]]]>

Delphina Rojo never imagined going into psychiatry.

But after gaining years of experience at Kern Behavioral Health & Recovery Services and a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from CSUB, Rojo is now taking Bakersfield’s first position as a recovery specialist tasked with handling 911 calls that certain Fulfill criteria. She provides psychiatric services for the Bakersfield Police Department Communications Center.

“A mental health worker would look for other things in law enforcement because of our training,” Rojo said. “Rather, it’s about connecting with the individual and guiding them towards what is most beneficial for their mental health.”

About 76 percent of the calls Rojo has taken since it began in August 2021 have been assisted with a psychological response rather than a police officer, said Fernanda Ramirez, head of Rojo’s interim unit.

That success led to plans to expand the program, Councilman Eric Arias said.

The City Council intends to add three more dispatchers who will be charged with similar duties, per the city’s proposed budget. The total cost for the program is $400,757, according to a plan expected to be discussed during a June 15 council meeting.

“The hope is that with these extra three people, we will provide 24/7 … opportunities for every person facing these types of mental health crises,” Arias said.

How it works

“I can’t take it anymore. Nobody cares about me.”

Rojo said she heard that chorus when she was answering calls. This statement, along with the caller’s statement that they swallowed an entire bottle of pills, prompts them to send the police.

But other, less extreme situations allow Rojo to listen. Some calls can last up to 30 minutes and end with referrals to various mental health services or the use of a mobile assessment team, Rojo said.

Ramirez said the mobile teams, made up of Kern BHRS employees, respond with officers to situations where services other than the police are needed.

Some people just need to vent, she said. Typically, 911 dispatchers will take a call and transfer the person to Rojo if the caller is speaking quickly and not listening to the instructions.

Rojo said she tries to answer a few questions when she first picks up a call: What’s the temperament of the caller? How do you listen to questions? What happened before they called 911?

Rojo has a soothing voice, said Ramirez, her interim supervisor.

“It’s a natural gift,” Ramirez said.

The supervisor has observed calls beginning with heightened anxiety and rambling. Rojo then applies grounding techniques and the conversation ends with the caller calmly thanking Rojo, Ramirez said. There is no need to dispatch a mobile assessment team or the police who could aggravate a situation.

Rojo, using her connection at Kern BHRS, can provide teams with knowledge of a repeat caller and send potential help, Ramirez added.

“It’s a privilege to be a part of the lives of so many people,” said Rojo, a Highland High School graduate and lifelong resident of Bakersfield.

“supervisor” instead of “enforcement”

Arias said city officials were trying to reconsider their approach to various emergencies following the death of George Floyd and the resulting protests. They have partnered with BPD and Kern BHRS to create a pilot program for mental health dispatchers to measure outcomes over the past year.

BPD spokesman Robert Pair said he would welcome the addition of people tasked with providing mental health support.

Mental health experts offer a “carer” response rather than “enforcement,” Pair said, citing the example of a resident who contacted 911 dispatchers multiple times a day who was concerned about someone having his brain wiretapped and controlled, said pair.

Deploying a police officer every time to ensure their safety is one possible solution, but connecting that resident to a mental health service can lead to “alternative strategies,” he added.

Officers who repeatedly respond to such situations have declined, Pair said, allowing police resources to address criminal activity instead.

“Having someone connected to the system (like Rojo) … tremendously important, not just for the safety of that person, but for the safety of our community overall,” Pair said.

You can reach Ishani Desai at 661-395-7417. You can also follow her on Twitter at @_ishanidesai.

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