Disability Insurance – Open Mind http://open-mind.org/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 11:01:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://open-mind.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-6-150x150.png Disability Insurance – Open Mind http://open-mind.org/ 32 32 Four financial priorities for 2022 https://open-mind.org/four-financial-priorities-for-2022/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 11:01:00 +0000 https://open-mind.org/four-financial-priorities-for-2022/ Even if you’re single and have no dependents, income protection insurance is important, but note the shortcoming that an illness often has to be ongoing for the insurer to pay out. Trauma insurance is slightly different in that it pays a lump sum for a diagnosis of the conditions listed. From my own experience, I […]]]>

Even if you’re single and have no dependents, income protection insurance is important, but note the shortcoming that an illness often has to be ongoing for the insurer to pay out.

Trauma insurance is slightly different in that it pays a lump sum for a diagnosis of the conditions listed.

From my own experience, I would also throw in health insurance. If not for yourself, provide these safeguards for your family.

pay off debts

Debt does nothing but pull you back. Every day you hold it, chances are it will end up costing you more. Most economic forecasts assume that lending rates will rise later this year.

The cheapest way to attack your debt is in interest rate descending order – that is, from the debt with the highest interest rate to the lowest interest rate.

That usually means a credit card first. The best way to get rid of this debt is to transfer your current card debt to a zero percent balance transfer credit card. You can get such a card – from a different provider than your previous one – for an interest-free period of up to 36 months. Use this time as an opportunity to pay off all your card debt.

Next comes a personal loan, then your mortgage—usually the cheapest of all interest rates.

With your mortgage, the smartest strategy is to refinance at a better rate and just keep your repayments the same.

The savings on interest and your time into debt – for not spending more money than you are already used to – is huge.

invest

Your last priority for 2022 should be increasing your overall wealth.

For example, while you can earn income for 40 years, it’s important to realize that you may need to stretch that amount of money out over 60+ years.

Luckily, we have an excellent pension system in the background to help us build a healthy nest egg for retirement.

With stock market returns soaring 13% in 2021 (ASX/S&P 200) and other assets buoyant, fund rating agency SuperRatings estimates the mid-balanced superfund has grown its balance sheet by 12.5% ​​over the past year.

Including employer contributions, you can contribute up to $27,500 before tax to your supervision this year (e.g., by forgoing salary).

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You may also be able to use unused certificates since 2019-20. This is especially worthwhile if you’ve withdrawn $20,000 that was available amid the financial hardship caused by the coronavirus to access super commissions early.

If you maneuver yourself and your family into a secure financial position, then save and invest, you could quickly be restored to a pre-pandemic position… and then watch yourself move fast.

Nicole Pedersen-McKinnon is the author of How to become mortgage free like me. Follow Nicole Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

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How this Labor Department candidate is threatening 59 million workers https://open-mind.org/how-this-labor-department-candidate-is-threatening-59-million-workers/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 21:26:42 +0000 https://open-mind.org/how-this-labor-department-candidate-is-threatening-59-million-workers/ According to a study by Upwork, 59 million Americans, or 1 in 3 workers, was in independent work in 2021. And 9 out of 10 of them believe that “the best days are ahead” for freelancers. (Freelancing, independent work, contracting, gig work, and self-employment describe any work that individuals perform independently rather than for a […]]]>

According to a study by Upwork, 59 million Americans, or 1 in 3 workers, was in independent work in 2021. And 9 out of 10 of them believe that “the best days are ahead” for freelancers.

(Freelancing, independent work, contracting, gig work, and self-employment describe any work that individuals perform independently rather than for a traditional employer).

But that could all change if the Senate votes to confirm David Weil as head of the Labor Department’s payroll and hours division.

Weil’s track record in the same position under the Obama administration and his statements and efforts to attack independent workers would not only dampen their bright prospects but could jeopardize their entire livelihoods and ways of life.

Self-employment was already increasing before the pandemic, as the desire for more flexibility and autonomy led some people to switch from traditional employment to independent work. The pandemic has only fueled the desire for more flexibility and autonomy. In 2021, 56% of non-freelancers said they are probably freelance in the future.

Another factor contributing to the rise of independent work is that the own-boss model opens doors to work for people who otherwise would not be able to work. 2021, 55% of the self-employed said they were unable to work for a traditional employer due to personal circumstances such as their health or child care.

Independent workers are also significantly happier with their jobs and their work-life balance about half by independent workers saying so no amount of money cause them to switch from freelance work to traditional employment.

Many companies – especially smaller ones – rely heavily on independent contractors to grow and compete with larger companies. Employers with four or fewer employees employ an average of seven contractors to run their businesses.

However, the policy advocated by Weil denies that it might be better to work for yourself than to work for a traditional employer and have job conditions, pay and working hours generally determined by a union.

One of the main goals of the Biden administration and Weils is the implementation of the PRO Act – a Big Labor wish list that includes the reversal of independent contracts.

But that’s just the beginning. Among other things, the PRO Act would be too: depriving workers of privacy and their right to vote by secret ballot; turn the job market upside down by turning the franchise business model on its head; void right-to-work laws in 27 states; and legalize secondary boycotts (subjecting neutral companies to union-led strikes, boycotts and harassment).

Since most of the PRO Act’s radical agenda is not possible by either regular order or the reconciliation process, a Wall Street Journal commentary noted: “The White House will task the Department of Labor with implementing as much of this as possible through regulatory orders. Weil would be a Chief Enforcer, and history shows he won’t be shy.”

Weil’s tenure in the Labor Department’s Wage and Hours division under the Obama administration included regulatory policies that made it harder for people to work for themselves and made it harder for businesses — especially smaller ones — to grow and thrive.

Weil’s attack on franchises — based on a scholarly paper he wrote about it, as opposed to real-world experience — cost franchisees an estimated $33.3 billion annually, cut employment by 376,000 jobs, and caused a 93% increase in lawsuits against franchises.

The Trump administration has undone that damage — by correctly determining legal liability based on whether a company has direct and immediate control over an employee. But now, the success and survival of thousands of franchise brands – including approximately 730,000 individual franchises Factories and 8.4 million workers – could be at stake, including 39% female Franchise owners who say they would not have been able to own their business without the franchise model.

And Weil has shown his audacity to ignore legal limits on administrative power. If confirmed, Weil will likely seek to revive his earlier overtime waiver, which a federal court found “unlawful” in 2016. The judge in this decision – appointed by Obama Judge Amos L. Mazzant III– said: “The department exceeds its delegated powers and ignores the intent of Congress.”

The job market is incredibly strong right now and is a silver lining to the COVID-19 pandemic increased flexibility, autonomy and a more family-friendly workplace policy. Most workers don’t want to go back two years, let alone more than half a century, to the Industrial Age unified union model that Weil wants to push through.

In addition, already with authorities such as the occupational safety authority exceed their legal authority Through vaccination and testing mandates for private employers, Congress should not arm the Labor Department with someone who has demonstrated a penchant for transgressing authority.

This piece originally appeared in The daily signal

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Do you get a check Final round of California stimulus payments by January 11th https://open-mind.org/do-you-get-a-check-final-round-of-california-stimulus-payments-by-january-11th/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 22:20:44 +0000 https://open-mind.org/do-you-get-a-check-final-round-of-california-stimulus-payments-by-january-11th/ The final round of $ 600 payments from California will complete the state’s pandemic stimulus plan on Tuesday, the Franchise Tax Board said. The 180,000 payments in this final round, valued at around $ 127 million, began in late December and should be received by January, the agency said. A previous round of 794,000 GSS […]]]>

The final round of $ 600 payments from California will complete the state’s pandemic stimulus plan on Tuesday, the Franchise Tax Board said.

The 180,000 payments in this final round, valued at around $ 127 million, began in late December and should be received by January, the agency said. A previous round of 794,000 GSS II payments worth approximately $ 568 million was made between December 13th and December 31st.

Since the end of August the Golden State Stimulus II program has issued approximately 8.2 million checks and direct deposits valued at just over $ 5.9 billion. The program is part of Gov. Gavin Newsoms Pandemic Recovery Plan. The $ 600 payments were for middle-income California residents earning less than $ 75,000 adjusted gross income. Qualified families received an additional $ 500 for loved ones.

At the start of the program, most of the stimulus payments were distributed by direct deposit to residents who filed their 2020 taxes electronically and provided a bank account for filing their tax returns.

But some qualified recipients like Joe Rocca of San Clemente never received a direct deposit and wondered if a payment would even arrive. “Another wonderfully run program by our state government” he said in November.

Rocca informed us that his payment was received in the form of a paper check in late December.

“We got it a week or so ago,” he said. “Just two months after we should have got it. Better late than never.”

The state also launched another pandemic program called Golden State Stimulus I. that went to lower-income residents who earned less than $ 35,000 in AGI.

We have asked the Franchise Tax Board to inform us about the current status of the program. The media officer Andrew LePage with the FTB gave these answers:

Q: How many payments were made in December prior to January 1, 2022?

A: Between December 13th and December 31st, approximately 794,000 GSS II checks worth more than $ 568 million were sent, and on December 10th, approximately 9,000 direct deposits were made, worth approximately $ 6.1 million issued.

The last round: From December 27th The state is expected to send around 180,000 GSS-II checks by January 11, 2022. In addition, the state issued around 1,400 GSS II direct deposits on December 24th. Taken together, the approximately 181,400 GSS II payments from the last round are estimated at approximately $ 127 million.

Q: How many payments will you run out in 2022?

A: The final scheduled round calls for GSS II payments to be sent out between December 27th and January 11th. A relatively small number of payments will also be made after January 11th. (More on this below.)

Q: Total amount of payments since the start of the GSSII program?

A: In the last round, the state issued or announced a total of more than 8.2 million GSS II checks and direct deposits valued at just over $ 5.9 billion.

At this point, the vast majority of GSS II payments have been issued or announced.

Recently we used a very rough estimate of a total of 8.5 million GSS II payments, when all were issued. Recent trends suggest that the final total could be between 8.3 million and 8.4 million GSS-II payments.

Q: Are there any leftovers to watch out for?

A: The FTB continues to process a relatively small number of tax returns that, for various reasons, require additional processing to ensure eligibility, and an unknown number of ITIN applicants have until February 15, 2022 to file their state return, to be eligible. for GSS. These are ITIN applicants who did not have an ITIN but who had applied for one by October 15, 2021, the deadline for filing the tax return.

Check your zip code: According to the GSS II website, the distribution plan for this final week is for residents with zip codes that end in 928-999.

Here’s the fine print

Excluded from payments are those whose income comes exclusively from benefits like Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and State Supplementary Payment (SSP) and the Cash Assistance Program for Immigrants (CAPI), Social Security, CalWorks, Unemployment, State Disability Insurance (SDI) and VA. originates from disability.

To get an estimate of your California stimulus payment, go to ftb.ca.gov.

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The risk of fatal complications in marijuana users doubles after a rare type of stroke https://open-mind.org/the-risk-of-fatal-complications-in-marijuana-users-doubles-after-a-rare-type-of-stroke/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 10:33:57 +0000 https://open-mind.org/the-risk-of-fatal-complications-in-marijuana-users-doubles-after-a-rare-type-of-stroke/ Research highlights: In adults with a certain type of stroke, those who used marijuana within the last 3 to 30 days were more than twice as likely to have had a major stroke complication, which increases the risk of death and disability. The study is the largest, examining the influence of THC, the mood-altering ingredient […]]]>

Research highlights:

  • In adults with a certain type of stroke, those who used marijuana within the last 3 to 30 days were more than twice as likely to have had a major stroke complication, which increases the risk of death and disability.
  • The study is the largest, examining the influence of THC, the mood-altering ingredient in marijuana, on complications after a bleeding stroke.

(NewMediaWire) – January 06, 2022DALLAS – Among people with one aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) stroke, a type of bleeding stroke, marijuana users lately are more than twice as likely to develop a dangerous complication that can lead to death or greater disability, according to a new study published today in. has been published stroke, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Stroke Association, a breakdown of the American Heart Association.

The study is the most extensive to investigate the effects of THC or Tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component (change in a person’s mental state) of marijuana in complications following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (a rare but severe form of stroke).

In aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, a weakened and bulging part of a blood vessel on the surface of the brain (called a ruptured aneurysm) bursts, causing bleeding in the space between the brain and the tissue that covers it. This type of stroke can be devastating, causing neurological disability in about 66% of people and death (during follow-up) in about 40%. Immediate treatment for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage focuses on stopping and preventing further bleeding. However, despite treatment, many patients may develop symptoms (such as speech or movement disorders) worsening in the 14 days following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. This is caused by blood from the first stroke irritating the blood vessels, making them narrow enough to cut off blood supply to part of the brain (called a vasospasm), causing further brain damage. This complication, known as delayed cerebral ischemia, is a leading cause of death and disability after aSAH stroke.

“We are all prone to a bleeding stroke or a ruptured aneurysm, but if you are a routine marijuana user you may be predisposed to a worse stroke outcome after that aneurysm burst,” said Michael T. Lawton, MD, lead author of the study and President and CEO of Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, Arizona.

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The researchers analyzed data from more than 1,000 patients treated for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage at Barrow Neurological Institute between January 1, 2007 to July 31, 2019. All patients were treated to stop the bleeding, either by 1) open surgery to cut off the base of the aneurysm, or 2) non-invasively, by threading a thin tube through a blood vessel to the base of the aneurysm and loosening the folding coils to fill in the space and prevent further bleeding.

Urine toxicology screening was performed in all patients admitted with ruptured aneurysms. The study compared the incidence of delayed cerebral ischemia in 46 people (mean age 47 years; 41% female) who tested positive for THC (the component of cannabis, also known as marijuana, that causes a high) and 968 people (mean age. ). 56 years old, 71% female) who tested negative for THC. A positive urine test for THC reflects cannabis exposure within three days of single use and approximately 30 days of frequent heavy use.

The youngest cannabis users did not have significantly larger aneurysms or worse stroke symptoms on admission, and were no more likely to have high blood pressure or other cardiovascular risk factors than patients who tested negative for THC. However, cannabis users were also more likely to test positive for other substances, including cocaine, methamphetamines, and tobacco, compared to patients who tested negative for THC.

Of all participants, 36% developed delayed cerebral ischemia; 50% remained with moderate to severe disability; and 13.5% died.

After adjusting for several patient characteristics, as well as recent exposure to other illicit substances, patients who tested positive for THC at the final follow-up were found to have:

  • 2.7 times more likely to develop delayed cerebral ischemia;
  • 2.8 times higher probability of medium-term to severe physical disability; and
  • 2.2 times more likely to die.

“If people come into the house with ruptured aneurysms and they have a history of cannabis use or a toxicological screening test positive, this should alert treatment teams that they are at higher risk for vasospasm and ischemic complications,” Lawton said. “Of all the substances found in the toxicology screen, only cannabis increased the risk of delayed cerebral ischemia. Cocaine and meth are antihypertensive drugs, so they are likely related to the actual rupture but have no effect on vasospasm.”

The study does not specifically address how cannabis increases the risk of vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia. Lawton noted, “Cannabis can interfere with oxygen metabolism and energy production in cells. When cells are stressed by a ruptured aneurysm, cells are much more susceptible to changes that affect oxygen delivery and blood flow to the brain.”

One of the limitations of the study is that it is done retrospectively at a single institution and is not a head-to-head analysis of people who use marijuana and those who don’t.

Researchers are currently doing follow-up examinations in the laboratory to better understand THC-related risks that can affect the formation and rupture of aneurysms. They are also pushing for more research to examine the effects of different doses of THC on stroke complications.

“Assessing the risks and benefits of marijuana use is more important given its popularity and as more states legalize recreational marijuana use,” Lawton said.

“The current study does not correspond to the scientific level of a randomized controlled study, but is a rigorous statistical analysis with more than 1,000 patients. “Said Robert L. Page II, Pharm.D., MSPH, FAHA, chair of the writing group for the the American Heart Association 2020 cannabis statement and professor at the chair for clinical pharmacy and at the chair for physical medicine / rehabilitation at the university Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences in Aurora, Colorado.

Are co-authors Joshua S. Catapano, MD; Kavelin Rumalla, MD; Visish M. Srinivasan, MD; Mohamed A. Labib, MD, CM; Candice L. Nguyen, BS; Caleb Rutledge, MD; Redi Rahmani, MD; Jacob F. Baranoski, MD; Tyler S. Cole, MD; Ashutosh P. Jadhav, MD, Ph.D .; Andrew F. Ducruet, MD; Joseph M. Zabramski, MD; and Felipe C. Albuquerque, MD

The researchers did not provide any sources of funding for this study.

In the . published studies the American Heart Association scientific journals are peer-reviewed. The statements and conclusions in each manuscript are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the politics or position of the association. The association does not give any assurances or guarantees for their correctness or reliability. The association is mainly financed by private individuals; Foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers, and other companies) also donate and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict guidelines to prevent these relationships from affecting the scientific content. Income from pharmaceutical and biotech companies, device manufacturers and health insurers as well as the association’s overall financial information are available here.

Additional resources:

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is a relentless force for a world with fewer strokes and longer, healthier lives. We work with millions of volunteers and donors to ensure equitable health and stroke care in all communities. We work to prevent, treat, and defeat stroke by funding innovative research, fighting for public health, and providing life-saving resources. the Dallas-based association was founded in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit Schlaganfall.org. follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

###

For media inquiries and AHA / ASA expert perspective: 214-706-1173

Karen Astle: 214-706-1392, [email protected]

For public inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

herz.org and Schlaganfall.org



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Don’t Make These 6 Money Mistakes In Your 30s, According To A Pension Expert https://open-mind.org/dont-make-these-6-money-mistakes-in-your-30s-according-to-a-pension-expert/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 14:57:25 +0000 https://open-mind.org/dont-make-these-6-money-mistakes-in-your-30s-according-to-a-pension-expert/ Wondering how to get on the road to financial stability? As the former Head of Pension At JPMorgan Asset Management, I have seen many paths to retirement and the critical steps – or missteps – people have made at every stage of their investment journey. Here are six key financial mistakes I made to people […]]]>

Wondering how to get on the road to financial stability?

As the former Head of Pension At JPMorgan Asset Management, I have seen many paths to retirement and the critical steps – or missteps – people have made at every stage of their investment journey.

Here are six key financial mistakes I made to people in their thirties and why you should avoid them:

1. Don’t have an emergency fund

An emergency fund is key to avoiding debt later in life when retirement planning should be a priority.

Ideally, this account should cover the cost of living for three to six months so you can avoid unexpected events like job loss or costly medical problems.

It is advisable to put your emergency fund in a savings account rather than an investment account so that you can access it right away and not have to worry about a downturn in markets affecting your money holdings.

2. Be underinsured

3. Make minimum payments on high interest debt

If you have a high interest student loan (at a Interest rate over 5.8%), Personal loans, or credit card debt, I always recommend paying these down as aggressively as you can before focusing on low-interest student loans, auto loans, or a mortgage.

In fact, on cheaper loans, it can make sense to only make the minimum payments until you get rid of the expensive loans. The faster you can pay these off, the more money you will have to spend on other financial goals that become more important as you age in your 30s.

4. Buying too much house

5. Don’t save aggressively for retirement

When you’re in your 30s, retirement may seem a long way off. But every dollar you save for retirement now has 10 to 20 more years to accumulate than the money you saved in your 40s and 50s.

If you work for an employer on a 401 (k) or 403 (b) plan, you will save at least enough to get the employer match. It is the only guaranteed return on your savings you will ever get. If your job doesn’t offer a 401 (k) plan, set up an IRA to automatically transfer money from your checking account on payday.

If you fail to make the most of the contributions you can make, promise yourself that every time you get a raise, you will increase the amount you save.

6. Save for your children before you save for yourself



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Indiana Life Insurance CEO says deaths among people ages 18 to 64 have increased 40% https://open-mind.org/indiana-life-insurance-ceo-says-deaths-among-people-ages-18-to-64-have-increased-40/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 13:47:00 +0000 https://open-mind.org/indiana-life-insurance-ceo-says-deaths-among-people-ages-18-to-64-have-increased-40/ FROM MARGARET QUANTITY THE EMPLOYEE IN THE CENTER SQUARE (The Center Square) – The head of Indianapolis-based insurance company OneAmerica said the death rate among people of working age had increased by a staggering 40% from pre-pandemic levels. “We are currently seeing the highest death rates that we have seen in the history of this […]]]>

FROM MARGARET QUANTITY

THE EMPLOYEE IN THE CENTER SQUARE

(The Center Square) – The head of Indianapolis-based insurance company OneAmerica said the death rate among people of working age had increased by a staggering 40% from pre-pandemic levels.

“We are currently seeing the highest death rates that we have seen in the history of this company – and not just at OneAmerica,” said the company’s CEO Scott Davison during an online press conference this week. “The data is consistent for all players in this business.”

OneAmerica is a $ 100 billion insurance company headquartered in Indianapolis since 1877. The company employs approximately 2,400 people and sells life insurance, including group life insurance, to employers in the state.

Mr Davison said the increase in deaths was a “very large number” and that it was not the elderly who were dying, but “mainly people of working age between 18 and 64” who were employees of companies with group life insurance plans in America.

“And what we just saw in the third quarter, we see that the fourth quarter mortality rates are 40% higher than before the pandemic,” he said.

“Just to give you an idea of ​​how bad this is, a three-sigma or a one-in-200 disaster would mean a 10 percent increase over the pre-pandemic,” he said. “So 40% are simply unknown.”

Mr. Davison was one of several business leaders who spoke during the December 30th virtual press conference organized by the Indiana Chamber of Commerce.

Most of the death claims submitted are not classified as COVID-19 deaths, Mr Davison said.

“What the data shows us is that the deaths reported as COVID deaths greatly underestimate the actual death toll among people of working age from the pandemic. It might not all be COVID on her death certificate, but the deaths are just huge.

At the same time, he said the company is seeing an “upswing” in disability entitlements, first short-term disability entitlements and now the increase in long-term disability entitlements.

“For OneAmerica, we expect the cost to be well in excess of $ 100 million, and this is our smallest business. So it has a big impact on it, ”he said.

He said the costs would be passed on to employers who take out group life insurance policies, who have to pay higher premiums.

The CDC’s weekly death toll, which reflects information on death certificates and therefore has a delay of up to eight weeks or more, shows that there were far fewer deaths from COVID-19 in Indiana than in the week leading up to November 6th a a year ago – 195 verses 336 – but more deaths from other reasons – 1,350 versus 1,319.

However, those deaths affected individuals of all ages, while the information Davison cited involved people of working age who are employees of companies with group life insurance policies.

At the same press conference Mr. Davison spoke, Brian Tabor, president of the Indiana Hospital Association, said hospitals across the state were inundated with patients “with many different diseases” and were declining during the pandemic. “

On a follow-up call, he said he had no breakdown showing why so many people are being hospitalized in the state – for what conditions or illnesses. But he said the exceptionally high death rate quoted by Davison was equivalent to what hospitals in the state are seeing.

“What it vindicated for me is that it pierces what we see on the front end,” he said.

The number of hospital admissions in the state is now higher than it was before the COVID-19 vaccine was introduced a year ago and, in fact, higher than it has been in the last five years, said Dr. Lindsay Weaver, Indiana chief medical officer, at a press conference with Governor Eric Holcomb on Wednesday.

Only 8.9% of intensive care beds are available in hospitals in the state, a low for the year and less than any time during the pandemic. But the majority of ICU beds are not occupied by COVID-19 patients – only 37% are, while 54% of ICU beds are occupied by people with other illnesses or ailments.

The state’s online dashboard shows the moving average of daily deaths from COVID-19 is less than half of last year. At the height of the pandemic a year ago, 125 people died in one day – on December 29, 2020. In the past three months, the highest number of deaths in one day was on December 13th. at 58.


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Should Canadians be able to report rapid test results as provinces restrict PCR testing? https://open-mind.org/should-canadians-be-able-to-report-rapid-test-results-as-provinces-restrict-pcr-testing/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 20:28:24 +0000 https://open-mind.org/should-canadians-be-able-to-report-rapid-test-results-as-provinces-restrict-pcr-testing/ As more provinces roll back PCR testing for COVID-19 and the Omicron variant continues to rise, many people in Canada rely on the results of quick antigen tests to take away when they get their hands on them. However, in much of the country, rapid tests are not counted and are not included in the […]]]>

As more provinces roll back PCR testing for COVID-19 and the Omicron variant continues to rise, many people in Canada rely on the results of quick antigen tests to take away when they get their hands on them.

However, in much of the country, rapid tests are not counted and are not included in the official provincial case census. Some medical experts warn that it is important to document these results in order to keep track of the progress of the pandemic.

“We need it for a number of things,” said Sally Otto, an evolutionary biologist at UBC and a member of BC’s COVID-19 modeling team.

“To predict when we will be at the height of this Omicron wave, we need to know how many people are infected with it is it really difficult to say, are we still at the beginning of this wave or are we at the end of this wave?”

  • Do you have a coronavirus question or news tip for CBC News? Send an email to ask@cbc.ca.

Manitoba says it is making self-administered rapid tests available to take away at test sites across the province. (David Horemans / CBC)

Follow-up of positive rapid test results is extremely limited as most jurisdictions do not have any form of reporting system and in several parts of Canada it is becoming increasingly difficult for people to access other forms of testing.

For example, on Thursday, Ontario changed its testing guidelines to say that people who get positive results on rapid antigen tests will no longer need PCR testing for confirmation. And starting Friday, the province will also limit PCR testing to high-risk individuals who are symptomatic, vulnerable populations and workers in high-risk environments.

There is a patchwork of approaches to documenting rapid test results in jurisdictions across Canada in order to document rapid test results, such as:

A piecemeal will not be so good.– Sally Otto, member of BC’s COVID-19 modeling team

“A piecemeal effort won’t be that good to get a good sense of how many people are actually infected right now, what predicted stress the hospital stay will result in, and when we will get through it. “Said Otto.

The precedent for reporting rapid tests already exists: The UK encourages residents of the past nine months to report their results – positive, negative or invalid.

“The best data we had on the COVID pandemic came from the UK and that was because of their strong data analytics framework. They have data on cases related to hospitalizations and vaccinations, and that’s world class, “said Otto.

Next Steps

Jarvis Schmid from Calgary tested positive for COVID-19 in a rapid test on Boxing Day.

After processing the message, the next thing Schmid asked himself was what to do with his result.

Jarvis Schmid from Calgary tested positive for COVID-19 in a rapid test on December 26th. Unsure what to do with the result, he put it on his own electronic medical record. (Google Meet)

“I remember someone saying something about how good it is to have these records on hand. What if you have long-term symptoms or it helps with the diagnosis? ”Said the 38-year-old, who has isolated himself from his family.

Since Alberta does not have a system for tracking rapid test results, Schmid has instead uploaded a photo of his rapid test, along with the date he took the test, to his electronic medical record.

“I understand that they probably couldn’t set something up right away. I hope that in the end they set up something that you can easily log. But right now it’s a bit of a scramble mode, ”he said.

However, not everyone agrees that a portal similar to Schmid would be helpful.

Dr. Stephanie Smith, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Alberta, said the nature of the follow-up requires people to be proactive in entering their results.

“I think the time, effort, and money that is required may not result in much of a benefit in providing more information than what we have from the subset of people who are still receiving PCR testing “Said Smith.

All along the line

Dr. David Keegan, a Calgary family doctor, is concerned that insurance companies may not accept results of a rapid antigen test for COVID-19 without confirmation from a PCR test result. (Google Meet)

Alberta’s GP, Dr. David Keegan said that something is better than nothing when it comes to tracking rapid test results.

His main concern is the bureaucratic consequences for patients who only have a positive rapid test and no PCR confirmation.

“Will the disability insurance companies accept this when people later look for a long-term disability to get benefits and access to services? Are these self-reported results accepted? We don’t know, ”said Keegan.

“Let’s hope they are. It would be just ideal if governments found a way to objectively collect such data and quick test results.”

Take a look: Don’t trust a negative quick test for New Year’s parties, says specialist

Do not trust a negative quick test for New Year’s parties, says specialist

COVID-19 rapid tests are only about 50% reliable compared to the Omicron variant and should not be used to clear the way for a New Year’s party, says Dr. Peter Jüni, Scientific Director of the COVID-19 Science Advisory Table in Ontario. (Alexandre Silberman / CBC) 1:37


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50 states of COVID-19 hospitalization data for people ages 18 to 59, now https://open-mind.org/50-states-of-covid-19-hospitalization-data-for-people-ages-18-to-59-now/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 05:43:41 +0000 https://open-mind.org/50-states-of-covid-19-hospitalization-data-for-people-ages-18-to-59-now/ The number of working-age people admitted to U.S. hospitals with COVID-19 increased dramatically between the last full week of November and the last full week of December. U.S. hospitals had 26,591 admissions of people ages 18 to 59 with COVID-19 in the week ended December 26, a 54% increase from the total for the week […]]]>

The number of working-age people admitted to U.S. hospitals with COVID-19 increased dramatically between the last full week of November and the last full week of December.

U.S. hospitals had 26,591 admissions of people ages 18 to 59 with COVID-19 in the week ended December 26, a 54% increase from the total for the week ended November 28, according to a latest comparison Community-level pandemic tracking report from the Data Strategy and Execution Workgroup of the White House COVID-19 team with the report released a month earlier.

Hospitalization rates for people ages 18-29 have increased particularly rapidly. The latest report shows that the absolute number of registrations in this age group has increased more than 100% in the past week alone in nine states and the District of Columbia.

It is possible that weekly comparisons have been negated by factors such as the Christmas holidays and the tendency for data reporting requirements to pile up as the month progresses.

However, month-to-month comparisons show that for the 18- to 59-year-old age group in the typical state, the number of COVID-19 hospital admissions per 100,000 people has increased from 5.5 to 7.5.

Government profile reports fail to indicate what percentage of hospital admissions are related to the COVID-19 Omicron variant and what percentage is caused by other variants. ONE Report on the prosecution of variants of government shows that around 58% of all new COVID-19 cases in the US are caused by the Omicron variant, up from none in November.

What the numbers mean

If the number of hospital admissions related to COVID-19 remained the same for the entire population for a full year, it would mean that about 1 in 300 people would be hospitalized for some time at some point in the year for the disease.

The figures on the impact of COVID-19 on people aged 18 to 59 are of great interest to life insurers, as people in this age group are more likely than people in other age groups to take out individual life insurance, employer-funded group life insurance, and individual and group disability insurance.

Currently, the United States has more than one working-age US citizen death with COVID-19 for every hospitalization of a patient with COVID-19 in that age group. That means the United States could see about 1,000 deaths of one person of working age with the disease per week for at least the next few weeks.

According to LIMRA, about half of adults in the United States have life insurance. Life insurers have talked about paying an average of about $ 50,000 in claims per pandemic-related death. Those numbers, combined with government working-age hospital data, could result in pandemic-related working-age mortality losses of about $ 25 million per week.

The states

State-level hospital admission rates of working age range from just 2.6 COVID-19 hospital admissions per 100,000 residents in Alaska to more than 13 in two Great Lakes states.

For the five states with the highest working-age hospital admission rates as of December 26, see the gallery above.

Changes in the number of working-age COVID-19 hospital admissions per 100,000 lives range from a decrease from 5.2 to 5.1 hospital admissions in Montana to an increase from 8.2 to 12.1 hospital admissions in New Jersey.

We put Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia on the state charts, but took them off the gallery because they are different from states in so many ways. If the District of Columbia were inducted into the gallery, it would lead the way in both working-age hospitalization rates and the change in hospitalization rates between November 28 and December 26.

In the District of Columbia, the hospitalization rate in the latest figures rose to 19.1 working-age hospitalizations per 100,000 population, from 3.4 hospitalizations per 100,000 population just a month earlier.

Hospitalizations of US residents aged 18 to 59 years, per 100,000 population

x December 26th November 28th change
Alabama 4.1 2.2 1.9
Alaska 2.6 3.8 -1.2
Arizona 9.6 11.0 -1.5
Arkansas 5.1 3.4 1.7
California 4.0 2.9 1.1
Colorado 11.9 12.9 -1.0
Connecticut 8.5 3.8 4.7
Delaware 12.6 7.4 5.2
District of Columbia 19.1 3.4 15.7
Florida 7.5 2.3 5.3
Georgia 7.5 3.1 4.4
Hawaii 3.1 1.3 1.8
Idaho 2.9 5.4 -2.5
Illinois 12.4 6.1 6.3
Indiana 13.6 10.3 3.3
Iowa 9.5 7.4 2.1
Kansas 9.1 5.6 3.6
Kentucky 10.3 6.6 3.6
Louisiana 6.9 1.7 5.2
Maine 5.4 7.1 -1.6
Maryland 12.3 4.5 7.8
Massachusetts 7.4 4.0 3.4
Michigan 11.4 12.6 -1.3
Minnesota 8.4 9.3 -0.9
Mississippi 3.4 1.6 1.7
Missouri 10.1 5.7 4.4
Montana 5.1 10.4 -5.2
Nebraska 5.8 7.4 -1.7
Nevada 8.1 7.0 1.1
New Hampshire 8.0 9.5 -1.5
New Jersey 12.1 3.9 8.2
New Mexico 7.7 9.8 -2.1
new York 10.8 4.9 5.9
North Carolina 5.4 3.5 1.9
North Dakota 7.2 11.9 -4.7
Ohio 16.1 11.6 4.5
Oklahoma 9.5 5.7 3.7
Oregon 2.7 2.7 0.0
Pennsylvania 9.1 7.7 1.4
Puerto Rico 1.4 0.2 1.2
Rhode Island 6.4 3.6 2.8
South carolina 5.3 2.4 2.8
South Dakota 9.5 8.4 1.1
Tennessee 5.8 3.0 2.7
Texas 6.9 3.6 3.3
Utah 6.6 7.1 -0.5
Vermont 5.4 3.7 1.8
Virginia 6.4 3.2 3.3
Washington 3.1 2.2 0.9
West Virginia 11.5 8.6 2.9
Wisconsin 9.5 8.5 1.0
Wyoming 4.1 5.9 -1.7
MEDIAN 7.5 5.5 1.8

xx

(Photo: Mongkolchon Akesin / Shutterstock)


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Australia is driving debts to a gentian level with no end in sight https://open-mind.org/australia-is-driving-debts-to-a-gentian-level-with-no-end-in-sight/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 04:10:22 +0000 https://open-mind.org/australia-is-driving-debts-to-a-gentian-level-with-no-end-in-sight/ “We go into the year 2022 with confidence and a lot of hope. We have one of the highest vaccination rates in the world and now one of the strongest economic recoveries in the world. All Australians can be proud of that. “ Loading However, Market Economics’ Stephen Koukoulas said any party that wins next […]]]>

“We go into the year 2022 with confidence and a lot of hope. We have one of the highest vaccination rates in the world and now one of the strongest economic recoveries in the world. All Australians can be proud of that. “

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However, Market Economics’ Stephen Koukoulas said any party that wins next year’s general election will have to cope with the huge debt that has been amassed over the past decade.

He said the coalition’s tax cap as a percentage of GDP would impact the rising cost of programs like the national disability insurance system and the government’s own pledge to increase defense spending. Labor had not announced any spending cuts or revenue increases that might be required by the May elections.

“Whoever wins the election has to deal with the budget situation and the debt level. I’m not saying we need an austerity budget, but small spending cuts – maybe a quarter of a percent of GDP – will certainly improve the situation, ”he said.

“The debt level is sustainable, but we have record low interest rates. When rates go up 100 or 200 basis points, the net interest calculation really starts to go up. “

Net interest is projected to hit a record $ 14.8 billion in 2021-22, more than forecast to be spent on the pharmaceutical benefits system this year.

And it’s not just the federal government that ramped up the debt.

Australian households are the second highest in the world according to the IMF, with only Swiss residents having more debt. In relation to GDP, the debt of Australian households is 123.53 percent and that of Switzerland 131.9 percent.

Only five other nations – Norway, Canada, Denmark, the Netherlands and South Korea – have household debt levels above 100 percent.

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Most of the debt is tied up in mortgages, which are the cheapest due to record low interest rates worldwide this century. However, some central banks have already started raising interest rates to meet emerging inflationary pressures, while banking regulators have raised concerns about the sharp rise in house prices in many countries, including Australia.

While the Reserve Bank has announced that it will not hike official interest rates until 2024, financial markets and economists expect the RBA to move in as early as the middle of next year.

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Rhys prepares for Noosa Triathlon https://open-mind.org/rhys-prepares-for-noosa-triathlon/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 18:07:01 +0000 https://open-mind.org/rhys-prepares-for-noosa-triathlon/ Rhys Tappenden didn’t start competing in triathlons until this year, but he continues to build his strength and nutrition knowledge through the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). The 45-year-old from Margate – who suffers from quadriplegics – works four days a week with an exercise physiologist with cycling and weights. Rhys said he had decided […]]]>

Rhys Tappenden didn’t start competing in triathlons until this year, but he continues to build his strength and nutrition knowledge through the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

The 45-year-old from Margate – who suffers from quadriplegics – works four days a week with an exercise physiologist with cycling and weights.

Rhys said he had decided to get fit when the Covid restrictions started and he thought this was the perfect opportunity to focus on yourself and eventually work towards competing in three triathlons this year and hopefully more in 2022.

“I started going to the gym with my exercise physiologist who got me moving,” Rhys said.

“We’d be in the gym up to two days a week, but I didn’t want three because it could get boring, so I thought, what are we going to do? We did some cardio and just pushed my day chair in, but then we wanted to go faster.

“I took out my old handwheel that I bought years ago, and so we started handwheeling for three minutes and off for three minutes.

“My exercise physiologist then asked me if I would like to do the Moreton Bay Triathlon, but we only had three months to train for it; I did the cycle and it took just under three hours. “

Rhys said he soon set his next goal of doing the Noosa Triathlon and then added another Moreton Bay Triathlon that was 40 minutes down from his original time.

“For this year’s Noosa Triathlon, I did the handbike part of it, that’s 40 kilometers, and it took me about two hours and 40 minutes; I really want to cut that down to two hours, ”he said.

Rhys said that having access to these supports will help him lose weight.

“At the beginning of my fitness journey, I had six sessions with a nutritionist that really gave me a good understanding and balance about what has changed with age and how to maintain my weight,” he said.

“I weighed 105 kilograms and now I’m back to 95 kilograms, which is roughly the weight I was before my accident; My goal is to definitely fall into the 80s. “

Rhys said his mental health had improved a lot since he had access to NDIS.

“I was kind of lost for many years, but then I got NDIS funding that allowed me to spend the last 12 months seeing an exercise physiologist who has become a good friend,” he said.

“It took me from a place where I didn’t really know where to turn and I didn’t really know what to do. They are excited and they are just as excited as I am. I think I’ve created a bit of a team for myself. “

Rhys hasn’t forgotten his first goal, skiing while sitting down.

“All of the basic fitness I build is the foundation I need to be able to enjoy something like this. then I just get in touch with disabled winter sports enthusiasts and organize them so that I can set them up and borrow them, ”he says.

“I would love to go to Thredbo or Perisher because I used to do all that snowboarding.”

Rhys also uses support at home, with staff helping him with cleaning, washing and preparing food.

Rhys received assistance in soliciting and implementing its NDIS funding from Carers Queensland’s local NDIS coordinating partner in the Moreton Bay community program.

Rhys said NDIS and Carers Queensland helped him achieve his goals.

“I could use the word revolution; a hundred percent turnaround. I can feel that at the moment, ”he said.

“It was an enormous year this year, and thanks to the opportunity to call in my exercise physiotherapist, we achieved many goals.”


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